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Sentiment Analysis with Global Topics and Local Dependency

AAAI Conferences

With the development of Web 2.0, sentiment analysis has now become a popular research problem to tackle. Recently, topic models have been introduced for the simultaneous analysis for topics and the sentiment in a document. These studies, which jointly model topic and sentiment, take the advantage of the relationship between topics and sentiment, and are shown to be superior to traditional sentiment analysis tools. However, most of them make the assumption that, given the parameters, the sentiments of the words in the document are all independent. In our observation, in contrast, sentiments are expressed in a coherent way. The local conjunctive words, such as “and” or “but”, are often indicative of sentiment transitions. In this paper, we propose a major departure from the previous approaches by making two linked contributions. First, we assume that the sentiments are related to the topic in the document, and put forward a joint sentiment and topic model, i.e. Sentiment-LDA. Second, we observe that sentiments are dependent on local context. Thus, we further extend the Sentiment-LDA model to Dependency-Sentiment-LDA model by relaxing the sentiment independent assumption in Sentiment-LDA. The sentiments of words are viewed as a Markov chain in Dependency-Sentiment-LDA. Through experiments, we show that exploiting the sentiment dependency is clearly advantageous, and that the Dependency-Sentiment-LDA is an effective approach for sentiment analysis.


A Hierarchical Aspect-Sentiment Model for Online Reviews

AAAI Conferences

To help users quickly understand the major opinions from massive online reviews, it is important to automatically reveal the latent structure of the aspects, sentiment polarities, and the association between them. However, there is little work available to do this effectively. In this paper, we propose a hierarchical aspect sentiment model (HASM) to discover a hierarchical structure of aspect-based sentiments from unlabeled online reviews. In HASM, the whole structure is a tree. Each node itself is a two-level tree, whose root represents an aspect and the children represent the sentiment polarities associated with it. Each aspect or sentiment polarity is modeled as a distribution of words. To automatically extract both the structure and parameters of the tree, we use a Bayesian nonparametric model, recursive Chinese Restaurant Process (rCRP), as the prior and jointly infer the aspect-sentiment tree from the review texts. Experiments on two real datasets show that our model is comparable to two other hierarchical topic models in terms of quantitative measures of topic trees. It is also shown that our model achieves better sentence-level classification accuracy than previously proposed aspect-sentiment joint models.


Learning Sentiment-Specific Word Embedding via Global Sentiment Representation

AAAI Conferences

Context-based word embedding learning approaches can model rich semantic and syntactic information. However, it is problematic for sentiment analysis because the words with similar contexts but opposite sentiment polarities, such as good and bad, are mapped into close word vectors in the embedding space. Recently, some sentiment embedding learning methods have been proposed, but most of them are designed to work well on sentence-level texts. Directly applying those models to document-level texts often leads to unsatisfied results. To address this issue, we present a sentiment-specific word embedding learning architecture that utilizes local context informationas well as global sentiment representation. The architecture is applicable for both sentence-level and document-level texts. We take global sentiment representation as a simple average of word embeddings in the text, and use a corruption strategy as a sentiment-dependent regularization. Extensive experiments conducted on several benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed architecture outperforms the state-of-the-art methods for sentiment classification.


Isotonic Conditional Random Fields and Local Sentiment Flow

Neural Information Processing Systems

We examine the problem of predicting local sentiment flow in documents, and its application to several areas of text analysis. Formally, the problem is stated as predicting an ordinal sequence based on a sequence of word sets. In the spirit of isotonic regression, we develop a variant of conditional random fields that is wellsuited to handle this problem. Using the Möbius transform, we express the model as a simple convex optimization problem. Experiments demonstrate the model and its applications to sentiment prediction, style analysis, and text summarization.


Isotonic Conditional Random Fields and Local Sentiment Flow

Neural Information Processing Systems

We examine the problem of predicting local sentiment flow in documents, and its application to several areas of text analysis. Formally, the problem is stated as predicting an ordinal sequence based on a sequence of word sets. In the spirit of isotonic regression, we develop a variant of conditional random fields that is wellsuited to handle this problem. Using the Möbius transform, we express the model as a simple convex optimization problem. Experiments demonstrate the model and its applications to sentiment prediction, style analysis, and text summarization.