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Quantum computing just got its first developer certification. Time to start studying?

ZDNet

Candidates will have to prove during the test that they can create and execute quantum computing programs using IBM's Qiskit. Developers can now be officially quantum-certified. IBM has unveiled a quantum developer certification which it says, once devs have passed the 60-question test, will act as proof of at least some of the skills required to build and run quantum programs. The certification, unsurprisingly, focuses on IBM's own quantum computing software development kit (SDK), Qiskit, which is an open-source platform based on Python scripts that enables developers to carry out a range of quantum experiments, from prototyping quantum algorithms to executing code on cloud-based quantum devices. Candidates to the new certification will have to prove during the test that they can create and execute quantum computing programs on IBM computers and simulators using Qiskit.


Quantum computers are coming. Get ready for them to change everything

ZDNet

Supermarket aisles filled with fresh produce are probably not where you would expect to discover some of the first benefits of quantum computing. Quantum computers offer great promise for cryptography and optimization problems. ZDNet explores what quantum computers will and won't be able to do, and the challenges we still face. But Canadian grocery chain Save-On-Foods has become an unlikely pioneer, using quantum technology to improve the management of in-store logistics. In collaboration with quantum computing company D-Wave, Save-On-Foods is using a new type of computing, which is based on the downright weird behaviour of matter at the quantum level.


Quantum computing skills are hard to find. Here's how companies are tackling the shortage

ZDNet

Quantum computing has the potential to fundamentally transform the technology industry by applying the weird effects of the quantum realm to complex business problems. But right now, quantum computing faces a more mundane problem itself: finding enough recruits. Demand for digital skills in the workplace has been on a steady upward trend for years, but the sudden increased reliance on technology since the start of 2020 has made competition in tech recruitment even more fierce. Quantum computers offer great promise for cryptography and optimization problems, and companies are racing to make them practical for business use. ZDNet explores what quantum computers will and won't be able to do, and the challenges that remain.


What is quantum computing? Everything you need to know about the strange world of quantum computers

ZDNet

While researchers don't understand everything about the quantum world, what they do know is that quantum particles hold immense potential, in particular to hold and process large amounts of information. What is quantum computing and how does it work? Quantum computing exploits the puzzling behavior that scientists have been observing for decades in nature's smallest particles – think atoms, photons or electrons. At this scale, the classical laws of physics ceases to apply, and instead we shift to quantum rules. While researchers don't understand everything about the quantum world, what they do know is that quantum particles hold immense potential, in particular to hold and process large amounts of information. Successfully bringing those particles under control in a quantum computer could trigger an explosion of compute power that would phenomenally advance innovation in many fields that require complex calculations, like drug discovery, climate modelling, financial optimization or logistics. As Bob Sutor, chief quantum exponent at IBM, puts it: "Quantum computing is our way of emulating nature to solve extraordinarily difficult problems and make them tractable," he tells ZDNet. What is a quantum computer?


Quantum Orchestration Platform: A virtual machine for quantum computing ZDNet

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We would not blame you if you've never heard of Quantum Machines before -- we had not either. Quantum Machines is an Israeli startup, funded with $5.5 million by Battery Ventures and TLV Partners, and founded by three physics PhDs: Itamar Sivan, Yonatan Cohen, and Nissim Ofek. They all spent many years in top universities working on the cutting-edge of quantum computing. All three of them began their PhDs with the expectation of continuing along the academic path. During their doctoral studies, however, Cohen and Sivan were part of the founding team of the Weizmann Institute Entrepreneurship Program.