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Tech world debate on robots and jobs heats up

#artificialintelligence

Washington (AFP) - Are robots coming for your job? Although technology has long affected the labor force, recent advances in artificial intelligence and robotics are heightening concerns about automation replacing a growing number of occupations, including highly skilled or "knowledge-based" jobs. Just a few examples: self-driving technology may eliminate the need for taxi, Uber and truck drivers, algorithms are playing a growing role in journalism, robots are informing consumers as mall greeters, and medicine is adapting robotic surgery and artificial intelligence to detect cancer and heart conditions. Of 700 occupations in the United States, 47 percent are at "high risk" from automation, an Oxford University study concluded in 2013. A McKinsey study released this year offered a similar view, saying "about half" of activities in the world's workforce "could potentially be automated by adapting currently demonstrated technologies."


Police drone finds man in ditch in Lincolnshire

BBC News

A man who crashed his car in freezing night-time temperatures was saved from hypothermia when he was found by a police thermal-imaging drone.


Interview: Artificial Intelligence: Thinking Outside the Box (Part One)

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is no longer the stuff of science fiction. While robot maids may not yet be a reality, researchers are working hard to create reasoning, problem-solving machines whose "brains" might rival our own. Seán Ó hÉigeartaigh (anglicized as Sean O'Hegarty), while enthusiastic about the benefits that AI can bring, is also wary of the technology's dark side. He holds a doctorate in genomics from Trinity College Dublin and is now executive director of the Center for the Study of Existential Risk at the University of Cambridge. He has played a central role in international research on the long-term impacts and risks of AI.


Interview: Artificial Intelligence: Thinking Outside the Box (Part One)

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is no longer the stuff of science fiction. While robot maids may not yet be a reality, researchers are working hard to create reasoning, problem-solving machines whose "brains" might rival our own. Seán Ó hÉigeartaigh (anglicized as Sean O'Hegarty), while enthusiastic about the benefits that AI can bring, is also wary of the technology's dark side. He holds a doctorate in genomics from Trinity College Dublin and is now executive director of the Center for the Study of Existential Risk at the University of Cambridge. He has played a central role in international research on the long-term impacts and risks of AI.