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IP Osgoode » Intellectual Property Strategy For Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence ("AI") is a technical field of computer science that includes machine learning, natural language processing, speech processing, expert systems, robotics and machine vision. The term "artificial intelligence" is sometimes challenged in favor of machine intelligence or machine learning. Machine learning automates decision making using programming rules and in some cases training data sets. Human subject matter experts can provide feedback on results as part of a training process. Machine learning can adapt its programming based on the training process and feedback.


IP Australia sees 10 percent jump in Australian patent applications

ZDNet

Innovation by Australians is on the rise both locally and abroad, according to the latest details provided by the Australian Intellectual Property Report 2016. The annual report by IP Australia has revealed Australian businesses are increasingly protecting their inventions, brands, and designs. In 2015, patent applications grew by 10 percent; trademarks saw the best growth in a decade, increasing by 14 percent; and design applications peaked totalling 7,024 applications, a 6 percent increase from the 5 percent dip in 2014. More specifically, IP Australia said it received 28,605 standard patent applications in 2015, of which 92 percent were made up of filings by non-residents and the remaining 8 percent were patent filings by Australian residents. Patent filings by non-residents and Australian residents increased by 10 percent and 16 percent respectively during 2015.


Creepy patent suggests Facebook wants to use your pictures to help advertisers target your friends

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Facebook was given the green light on a patent that suggests it may rove users' personal pictures to be re-purposed as adverts for certain products and brands. A patent on the concept, called'Computer-vision content detection for sponsored stories' was granted in the U.S. this week, and if deployed, would act as a useful tool for brands seeking new ways to engage Facebook users. According to a patent description, by identifying certain products in a user's pictures, Facebook could theoretically partner with a brand to leverage those photos in a kind of online advert. Facebook doesn't just want users to see advertisements, in a new patent, users would actually be the advertisements themselves. One hypothetical application outlined by the company in its patent involves its theoretical tool tagging a user who appears on Facebook drinking Grey Goose branded vodka.


WTF? Procter & Gamble applies to trademark LOL and other internet slang to attract millennials

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The company behind Tide detergent is hoping to reach more millennials by co-opting internet slang words in the hopes that it will up its cool factor. Procter & Gamble has applied to trademark popular acronyms like'LOL,' 'WTF,' 'NBD' and'FML.' It hopes to use the terms in liquid soap, dishwashing detergent, hard surface cleaners and air fresheners. The firm behind Tide is hoping to reach millennials by co-opting internet slang words in the hopes that it will up its cool factor. Procter & Gamble has moved to trademark several popular texting acronyms for use on its household products.


Tech Executives Tap Employees for Ideas

#artificialintelligence

Employees can get time, and sometimes money, to pursue projects that executives see as having strong market potential. Accounting firm Ernst & Young LLP this year gave a team of employees in Australia $100,000 to build a tool that uses automation to manage cybersecurity. It is currently being developed for client use. "It's more important than ever for us to make sure the right ideas are bubbling up from people on the ground," said Jeff Wong, global chief innovation officer for Ernst & Young, which brands itself as EY. Large organizations need to make an effort to adapt to change quickly, Mr. Wong said, where in the past, they could afford to wait to see how change affected the market.