Google Brain co-founder raises $175 million fund for AI startups

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Ng announced Tuesday that he raised money from venture capital firms New Enterprise Associates, Sequoia Capital and Greylock Partners as well as SoftBank Group Corp. Under Ng, Baidu released a voice-based operating system that users can talk to - much like Amazon's Alexa voice assistant or Apple's Siri - and also started working on self-driving cars and face recognition technology to open things like transit turnstiles when users approach. I think it's a more systematic, repeatable process than most people think," said Ng, who also taught artificial intelligence courses at Stanford University. The first company to receive money from the fund will be Landing.ai,


Google Assistant Vs Alexa: Which AI Will Control Your Home?

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Google Pixel Tomorrow, Oct 4, is Google's day with the tech giant expected to launch products from new Pixel smartphones to showcase what Android can do ( and already leaked as below), to the much hyped about smart home hub, the Google Home speaker. This product, which will make use of its voice-enabled AI Google Assistant, is meant to be a direct rival to Amazon's Alexa. But as voice-control heats up, and consumers grow more comfortable running their homes by just saying what they want, tech companies are eager to be the app used to run people's lives. Images of Google Pixel phones were leaked late last night by a retailer Carphone Warehouse, before images were taken down. California has just given the greenlight to self-driving cars--without drivers.


Facial Recognition Can Steal Our Privacy -- But Not if One Project Succeeds

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University of Toronto graduate student Avishek "Joey" Bose, under the supervision of associate professor Parham Aarabi in the school's department of electrical and computer engineering, has created an algorithm that dynamically disrupts facial recognition systems. The project has privacy-related and even safety-related implications for systems that use so-called machine learning -- and for all of us whose data may be used in ways we don't realize. Major companies such as Amazon, Google, Facebook and Netflix are today leveraging machine learning. Financial trading firms and health care companies are using it, too -- as are smart car manufacturers. What is machine learning, anyway?


Symbolic Traffic Scene Analysis Using Dynamic Belief Networks 1 Introduction

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An important task for progress in IVHS (Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems) is the development of methods for real-time traffic scene analysis. All three major applications of IVHS - ADIS (Advanced Driver Information Systems), ATMS (Advanced Traffic Management Systems), and AVCS (Automated Vehicle Control Systems) - could benefit from accurate, high-level descriptions of traffic situations. For example, an ADIS and an ATMS could use information about traffic congestion and accidents to alert drivers or to direct vehicles to alternate routes. An ATMS also could analyze local traffic at intersections to identify those with higher risk of accidents. Finally, an AVCS would need information about the actions of neighboring vehicles and the condition of traffic lanes ahead to control an automated car moving along a freeway [6].


Startup CEOs on how to keep the artificial intelligence ball rolling in Canada

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The next time you pull out your smartphone and ask Siri or Google for advice, or chat with a bot online, take pride in knowing that some of the theoretical foundation for that technology was brought to life here in Canada. Indeed, as far back as the early 1980s, key organizations such as the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research embarked on groundbreaking work in neural networks and machine learning. Academic pioneers such as Geoffrey Hinton (now a professor emeritus at the University of Toronto and an advisor to Google, among others), the University of Montreal's Yoshua Bengio and the University of Alberta's Rich Sutton produced critical research that helped fuel Canada's rise to prominence as a global leader in artificial intelligence (AI). Stephen Piron, co-CEO of Dessa, praises the federal government's efforts at cutting immigration processing timelines for highly skilled foreign workers. Canada now houses three major AI clusters – in Toronto, Montreal and Edmonton – that form the backbone of the country's machine-learning ecosystem and support homegrown AI startups.