Microsoft Pix captures better pictures of people, and now whiteboards too

#artificialintelligence

From the outset, Microsoft Pix has used artificial intelligence to help people more easily capture better pictures of family and friends with an iPhone. Now, you can use the smartphone camera app to take better pictures of documents, whiteboards and business cards, too. Because, let's face it, we all use our cameras to take photos of more than just people and places. "We have data that shows people are taking a lot of whiteboard photos at work, they are doing a lot of document scanning," said Josh Weisberg, a principal program manager in the Computational Photography Group within Microsoft's research organization in Redmond, Washington. Based on the app data and customer feedback, Weisberg's team released an update on Thursday to Microsoft Pix that includes enhanced deep-learning capabilities around image understanding to address several productivity scenarios.


New iPhone to improve facial recognition feature so it can see owner better, report claims

The Independent

Apple's next iPhone could bring important updates to its flagship feature, according to a new rumour. The phone could vastly improve the Face ID facial recognition that sits in the top of the handset. New technology will allow the invisible lights that are used as part of the system to illuminate people's face far better, allowing it to recognise its owners more quickly, according to a report from reliable Apple analyst Ming-chi Kuo. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.


Facial recognition helps mom and dad see kids' camp photos, raises privacy concerns for some

USATODAY

A photo from a summer camp posted to the camp's website so parents can view them. Venture capital-backed Waldo Photos has been selling the service to identify specific children in the flood of photos provided daily to parents by many sleep-away camps. Camps working with the Austin, Texas-based company give parents a private code to sign up. When the camp uploads photos taken during activities to its website, Waldo's facial recognition software scans for matches in the parent-provided headshots. Once it finds a match, the Waldo system (as in "Where's Waldo?") then automatically texts the photos to the child's parents.


After Facebook lobbying failed, Google takes aim at U.S. law banning use of biometric data without consent

The Japan Times

SAN FRANCISCO – Alphabet Inc. is pushing efforts to roll back the most comprehensive biometric privacy law in the U.S., even as the company and its peers face heightened scrutiny after the unauthorized sharing of data at Facebook Inc. While Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg were publicly apologizing this month for failing to protect users' information, Google's lobbyists were drafting measures to de-fang an Illinois law recognized as the most rigorous consumer privacy statute in the country. Their ambition: to strip language from a decade-old policy that regulates the use of fingerprints, iris scans and facial recognition technology, and insert a loophole for companies embracing the use of biometrics. Google is trying to exempt photos from the Illinois law at a time when it's fighting a lawsuit in the state that threatens billions of dollars in potential damages. The world's largest search engine is facing claims that it violated the privacy of millions of users by gathering and storing biometric data without their consent.


Facebook's facial recognition features could cost it billions of dollars

Mashable

If you thought Facebook was already having a bad couple weeks, a federal judge just reminded us that things could get a whole lot worse for the company. A judge in San Francisco ruled Monday that Facebook users in Illinois can proceed with a class action suit against the company over its use of facial recognition software. The suit has the potential to cost the social network billions of dollars in fines. SEE ALSO: How data scientists see the future after Facebook's Cambridge Analytica scandal The lawsuit stems from Illinois' strict laws around biometric privacy. The state's Biometric Information Privacy Act allows residents of the state to sue tech companies that don't adhere to the law, which requires tech companies to obtain prior consent before they collect biometric data.