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Why The Tesla/Mobileye Fight Defines An Industry-Wide Schism

#artificialintelligence

Mobileye and Tesla have begun trading barbs illuminating the real reason behind their split. "[Tesla's Autopilot] is not designed to cover all possible crash situations in a safe manner," said Amnon Shashua, Chairman and CTO of Mobileye, the Israel-based maker of collision detection and driver assistance systems. "[Telsa] was pushing the envelope in terms of safety." "When Tesla refused to cancel its own vision development activities and plans for deployment, Mobileye discontinued hardware support for future platforms and released public statements implying that this discontinuance was motivated by safety concerns." Mobileye--the company whose technology underlies the majority of ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistance Systems) and semi-autonomous driving suites on the market, may not be at the cutting edge of the technology on which they've built their reputation.


Intel to supply carmaker with eight MILLION self-driving computers - but won't say which one

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Intel's autonomous driving unit just landed a big contract. Israeli tech firm Mobileye has signed a deal to supply eight million cars at a European automaker with its self-driving technologies, a company official told Reuters. Financial terms of the deal and the identity of the automaker were not revealed. Israeli tech firm Mobileye has signed a deal to supply eight million cars at a European automaker with its self-driving technologies. The deal marks one of the largest yet for Mobileye and is a sign of how carmakers and suppliers are accelerating the introduction of features that automate certain driving tasks, like highway driving and emergency braking, to generate revenue.


Intel set to roll out 100 self-driving cars

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Silicon Valley giant Intel on Wednesday announced plans for a fleet of self-driving cars following its completion of the purchase of Israeli autonomous technology firm Mobileye. A day after closing the $15 billion deal to buy Mobileye, which specializes in driver-assistance systems, Intel said it will begin rolling out fully autonomous vehicles later this year for testing in Europe, Israel, and the US. The fleet will eventually have more than 100 vehicles, according to Intel. Silicon Valley giant Intel on Wednesday announced plans for a fleet of self-driving cars following its completion of the purchase of Israeli autonomous technology firm Mobileye. Mobileye's software, which reads inputs from cameras, radar, and laser sensors and makes decisions on what an autonomous car should do.


In wake of fatal Tesla crash, BMW announces slower move to self-driving vehicles

Los Angeles Times

A day after the disclosure of the first death in a crash involving a self-driving vehicle, BMW on Friday announced plans to release a fleet of fully autonomous vehicles by 2021. In a partnership with Intel and Mobileye, the German automaker said its planned iNEXT model won't require a human in the driver's seat. That marks a different course toward self-driving vehicles than Tesla, which offers a self-driving "autopilot" feature -- though drivers are supposed to stay engaged and keep their hands on the steering wheel. That system was in use during a fatal crash in Florida in May in which a Tesla Model S failed to detect a big rig in its path and apply the brakes. BMW Chief Executive Harold Krueger addressed the Tesla crash during a news conference in Munich, Germany, on Friday, saying his company is not yet ready to roll out partially or fully autonomous vehicles.


Tesla Motors (TSLA), Mobileye Breakup Not Over Autopilot Safety, Elon Musk's Company Says

International Business Times

Tesla Motors Inc.'s Autopilot has been in the news a lot of late, and not only because of the vehicles crashes involving (or not) the self-driving system or updates to it that would have prevented at least some of those crashes. On Wednesday, Tesla's erstwhile partner in its Autopilot development, Israeli chipmaker Mobileye, said it had decided to split with the Elon Musk-owned company because of concerns over Autopilot, with Tesla "pushing the envelope in terms of safety." Speaking to Reuters, Mobileye Chairman Amnon Shashua said of Autopilot: "It is not designed to cover all possible crash situations in a safe manner. It is a driver assistance system and not a driverless system." In response, a Tesla spokeswoman had initially said the company never advertised its Autopilot as a self-driving technology or its cars as autonomous vehicles.