Unreported Side Effects of Drugs Are Found Using Internet Search Data, Study Finds

AITopics Original Links

Using data drawn from queries entered into Google, Microsoft and Yahoo search engines, scientists at Microsoft, Stanford and Columbia University have for the first time been able to detect evidence of unreported prescription drug side effects before they were found by the Food and Drug Administration's warning system. Using automated software tools to examine queries by six million Internet users taken from Web search logs in 2010, the researchers looked for searches relating to an antidepressant, paroxetine, and a cholesterol lowering drug, pravastatin. They were able to find evidence that the combination of the two drugs caused high blood sugar. The study, which was reported in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association on Wednesday, is based on data-mining techniques similar to those employed by services like Google Flu Trends, which has been used to give early warning of the prevalence of the sickness to the public. The F.D.A. asks physicians to report side effects through a system known as the Adverse Event Reporting System.


Is it cancer? Diagnosing yourself online is about to get easier

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When Liz Jurcik of Seattle felt a sharp pain in her side and back in January of 2013, she didn't think much about it. Jurcik, a 31-year-old human resources professional at Boeing, ran regularly and was in good shape. She thought it was probably a strained muscle from a workout. But the pain got worse, and by early February she could barely stand up. "I had the absolutely worst pain in my life," she said.


Is it cancer? Diagnosing yourself online is about to get easier

AITopics Original Links

When Liz Jurcik of Seattle felt a sharp pain in her side and back in January of 2013, she didn't think much about it. Jurcik, a 31-year-old human resources professional at Boeing, ran regularly and was in good shape. She thought it was probably a strained muscle from a workout. But the pain got worse, and by early February she could barely stand up. "I had the absolutely worst pain in my life," she said.


Ultragenyx Announces Positive Data from Phase 1/2 Study of DTX401 Gene Therapy in Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia - NASDAQ.com

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NOVATO, Calif., Sept. 04, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Ultragenyx Pharmaceutical Inc. (NASDAQ:RARE), a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of novel products for serious rare and ultra-rare genetic diseases, today announced positive data from the second dose cohort of the ongoing Phase 1/2 study of DTX401, an adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy for the treatment of glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa). All three patients in Cohort 2 have shown a clinical response with improvements in glucose control and other metabolic parameters compared to baseline. Patients in the first, lower dose cohort continue to show longer-term durability in response. The data were presented today at the Society for the Study of Inborn Errors of Metabolism (SSIEM) 2019 Annual Symposium in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Based on these results, Ultragenyx will enroll three additional patients into an expansion of cohort 2 at the same 6.0 10 12 GC/kg dose to confirm its use in the Phase 3 study.


Fake news about statins is discouraging the use of these life-saving drugs, expert warns

Los Angeles Times

Denial is not just for climate-change anymore. In a political environment in which charges of puffery, deception and fake news abound, a new controversy has been joined, and it returns to grounds that have long proved fertile for conspiracy theories: medicine. The newest charge of "fake news" has been lodged against those who would argue that statin medications cause more harm than good, and that fad diets, natural remedies and wishful thinking will protect you better from heart disease than these ubiquitous prescription drugs. They are everywhere on the Internet, says Cleveland Clinic cardiologist Dr. Steven Nissen. Type the term "statin risks" into a search engine, and you'll get about 3.5 million hits.