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Russia designs drone AI - part 1

#artificialintelligence

Combat drone engagement is becoming a usual practice. The unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) fight air defense and often win. Swarm tactic of drone engagement has emerged. It brings drone control to the foreground, as the usual operator-drone scheme often fails. Other technologies are necessary, the online Army Standard publication said.


Russia designs drone AI - part 2

#artificialintelligence

Combat drone engagement is becoming a usual practice. The unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) fight air defense and often win. Swarm tactic of drone engagement has emerged. It brings drone control to the foreground, as the usual operator-drone scheme often fails. Other technologies are necessary, the online Army Standard publication said.


Passenger drones will start flying for real in summer 2017

Mashable

If you make it to Dubai this summer, you might have the chance to catch a brand new type of self-driving vehicle. At today's World Government Summit, the head of the city's Roads & Transportation Agency, Mattar al-Tayer, announced plans to introduce a passenger-carrying drone service. The one-person drones could be ferrying commuters between predetermined checkpoints by July; the agency showed off the vehicle at an event, according to an AP report. "This is not only a model," al-Tayer said. "We have actually experimented with this vehicle flying in Dubai's skies."


The Ehang 184 personal drone is ready to fly

PCWorld

Last year the Ehang 184 autonomous aerial vehicle (AAV)--what we might call a big-ass drone--was a prototype. This year it's a real, flying vehicle, seasoned by 200-plus successful (non-crashing) test flights, and it just may start taking passengers for real in the near future. The Ehang 184 can accommodate one person weighing up to 220 pounds in its small cabin. The drone has a flying ceiling of 11,500 feet and can fly 30 to 40 miles on a single charge of its electrical battery. The drone flies itself--the passenger doesn't have to do anything.


It Just Got Easier for Fly Drones for Money

TIME - Tech

The Obama administration issued new regulations on commercial drone use Tuesday, clearing the way for farmers, businesses and other corporations to utilize "unmanned aircraft" in their day-to-day operations. The rule comes with several caveats: use of drones is restricted to daylight and twilight hours, operators are asked to avoid flying drones over people, and the aircraft are required to weigh 55 lbs. Operators--who have to be at least 16 years of age-- would be restricted to flying one drone at a time and vehicles would have to be within their line of sight. Pilots will also have to to pass a written test and undergo a security vetting process in order to operate the drones. Federal officials are willing to make some exceptions, offering applications for waivers for those who want to use their drones at night and fly over crowds.