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'Oldest film in existence' remastered with AI

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Artificial intelligence has been used to upscale the oldest film in existence, recorded in a garden in Leeds 132 years ago. Roundhay Garden Scene is a short film shot on October 14, 1888, showing four people strolling around the garden of Oakwood Grange in the Leeds suburb of Roundhay. The original black and white video, recorded by French inventor Louis Le Prince, is only 1.66 seconds long and comprises just 20 frames. But YouTuber Denis Shiryaev has posted a new version of the legendary video on his site, which is now in 4K quality at around 250 frames per second. Using a neural network to fill in the blanks and artificially generate additional frames, Shiryaev has been able to upscale the 20 original frames to give a much smoother sense of motion.


10 free apps that will make you a better gardener

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. However, our picks and opinions are independent from USA TODAY's newsroom and any business incentives. Gardening is a tricky business. There's growing zones and heirloom varieties and soil acidity and pruning shears, leaving even the most patient of people in a state of overwhelm. You might find yourself saying, "This is way too much work.


Motion Detecting Camera Recognizes Humans Using The Cloud

#artificialintelligence

Mark's solution was to come up with a motion activated security camera system that emails him when a human moves in the garden. And to make things more interesting from a technical standpoint, he does much of the processing in the cloud. He sends the cloud a photo with something moving in it, and he's sent an email only if it has a human in it. He used Motion to examine the camera's images and look for any frames with movement. His code sent him an email with a photo every time motion was detected.


10 home decor trends everyone will be obsessing over in 2018

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. However, our picks and opinions are independent from USA TODAY's newsroom and any business incentives. We all know that trends can be fickle, and home décor is certainly not immune. One day, millennial pink is splashed across your Pinterest feed, and the next, all you see are jewel tones. People's tastes change with the times, and if you're someone who loves your home to look innovative and modern, then you likely pay attention to the yearly trend reports as soon as they're published.


Nature's majesty

BBC News

This late autumn photo - from Snowdonia National Park in North Wales - has been crowned the overall winner of the 10th annual International Garden Photographer of the Year competition. Taken by Lee Acaster, and entitled Left, this stark image won the Trees, Woods and Forests category - and then beat thousands of other entries to win the top spot. Garden designer Chris Beardshaw - one of the competition judges - says the photo "perfectly encapsulates both the extremes of fortune and personality of these giants". While Clare Foggett - who edits The English Garden Magazine - says the image "draws the viewer in, to reveal the still surface of the lake behind. Scroll down to see a selection of some of the best images from each category.