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Can artificial intelligence encourage good behaviour among internet users?

#artificialintelligence

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept 25 ― Hostile and hateful remarks are thick on the ground on social networks in spite of persistent efforts by Facebook, Twitter, Reddit and YouTube to tone them down. Now researchers at the OpenWeb platform have turned to artificial intelligence to moderate internet users' comments before they are even posted. The method appears to be effective because one third of users modified the text of their comments when they received a nudge from the new system, which warned that what they had written might be perceived as offensive. The study conducted by OpenWeb and Perspective API analyzed 400,000 comments that some 50,000 users were preparing to post on sites like AOL, Salon, Newsweek, RT and Sky Sports. Some of these users received a feedback message or nudge from a machine learning algorithm to the effect that the text they were preparing to post might be insulting, or against the rules for the forum they were using.


Can artificial intelligence encourage good behaviour among Internet users?

#artificialintelligence

Hostile and hateful remarks are thick on the ground on social networks in spite of persistent efforts by Facebook, Twitter, Reddit and YouTube to tone them down. Now researchers at the OpenWeb platform have turned to artificial intelligence to moderate Internet users' comments before they are even posted. The method appears to be effective because one third of users modified the text of their comments when they received a nudge from the new system, which warned that what they had written might be perceived as offensive. The study conducted by OpenWeb and Perspective API analysed 400,000 comments that some 50,000 users were preparing to post on sites like AOL, Salon, Newsweek, RT and Sky Sports. Some of these users received a feedback message or nudge from a machine learning algorithm to the effect that the text they were preparing to post might be insulting, or against the rules for the forum they were using.


Can Machines Change Human Behavior? OpenWeb Releases a Case Study

#artificialintelligence

OpenWeb, a leading audience engagement and conversation platform released the findings of an extensive study done in collaboration with Jigsaw's Perspective API. Jigsaw is a unit within Google that forecasts and confronts emerging threats, creating future-defining research and technology to keep our world safer. Perspective API is a tool developed by Jigsaw that makes it easier to host better conversations, by using machine learning models to detect the potential toxicity of a comment. The study measured the impact of deploying a "nudge" to potentially offensive or profane comments, encouraging commenters to reevaluate their message. The goal of the test was to measure if such a nudge could reduce toxicity within conversations.


To Clean Up Comments, Let AI Tell Users Their Words Are Trash

WIRED

Comment sections have long acted like the wiry garbage cans of news websites, collecting the worst and slimiest of human thought. Thoughtful reactions get mixed in with off-topic offal, personal attacks, and the enticing suggestions to "learn how to make over $7,000 a month by working from home online!" (So goes the old adage: never read the comments.) Things got so bad in the last decade that many websites put the kibosh on comments altogether, trading the hope of lively, interactive debate for the promise of peace and quiet. But while some people ran away screaming, others leapt in with a mission to make the comment section better. Today, dozens of newsrooms use commenting platforms like Coral and OpenWeb that aim to keep problematic discourse at bay with a combination of human chaperones and algorithmic tools.


Adobe to kill off Flash plug-in by 2020

BBC News

Adobe Systems has said that it plans to phase out its Flash Player plug-in by the end of 2020. The technology was once one of the most widely used ways for people to watch video clips and play games online. But it also attracted much criticism, particularly as flaws in its code meant it became a popular way for hackers to infect computers. In recent years, much of its functionality has been offered by the rival HTML5 technology. One of HTML5's benefits is that it can be used to make multimedia content available within webpages without requiring users to install and update a dedicated plug-in.