Pentagon working to develop technology that would let troops control machines with their MINDS

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The Pentagon's research arm is moving forward with a project that intends to bridge the gap between humans and machines. DARPA will select teams today to develop a neural interface as part of its new N3 program, with a goal of developing systems that would allow troops to send and receive information using their brainwaves, according to Nextgov. This means troops could one day control drones, cyber defense systems, and other technology with their mind. It might sound like science fiction, but the agency is looking to see this done in one of two ways: a non-invasive device outside of the body, or a non-surgical system that could be swallowed, injected, or delivered up the nose. The Pentagon's research arm is moving forward with a project that intends to bridge the gap between humans and machines.


DARPA's latest idea could put today's Turing-era computers at risk

#artificialintelligence

The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has come up with some crazy ideas in the past, and its latest idea is to create computers that are always learning and adapting, much like humans. Mobile devices, computers, and gadgets already have artificial intelligence features, with notable examples being Apple's Siri, Microsoft's Cortana, and Amazon's Alexa. But these devices can only learn and draw conclusions within the scope of information pre-programmed into systems. Existing machine-learning techniques don't allow computers to think outside the box, so to speak, or think dynamically based on the situations and circumstances. The goal of a new DARPA project is to create computers that think like biological entities and are continually learning.


DARPA's latest idea could put today's Turing-era computers at risk

PCWorld

The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has come up with some crazy ideas in the past, and its latest idea is to create computers that are always learning and adapting, much like humans. Mobile devices, computers, and gadgets already have artificial intelligence features, with notable examples being Apple's Siri, Microsoft's Cortana, and Amazon's Alexa. But these devices can only learn and draw conclusions within the scope of information pre-programmed into systems. Existing machine-learning techniques don't allow computers to think outside the box, so to speak, or think dynamically based on the situations and circumstances. The goal of a new DARPA project is to create computers that think like biological entities and are continually learning.


DARPA Expands 'Lifelong' Machine Learning Effort

#artificialintelligence

As AI and machine learning systems advance, real-world applications are exposing limitations such as the inability to adapt to situations beyond the narrow tasks those systems were trained to perform. Indeed, some observers note that AI researchers still do not understand the mechanisms by which automated systems learn. As AI researchers grapple with these unknowns, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) launched a program last year aimed at advancing "lifelong machine learning." This week, the research agency announced funding for three university research teams that will tackle various components of the adaptability problem. Those efforts augment initial research at Columbia University focused on reproducing neural networks.


DARPA to explore the "third wave" of artificial intelligence - SD Times

#artificialintelligence

Despite the advancements made in artificial intelligence so far, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) believes there is still more work to be done. DARPA is launching the Artificial Intelligence Exploration (AIE) program as part of its broader AI investment strategy. "DARPA has established a streamlined process to push the state of the art in AI through regular and relatively short-term technology development projects," said Peter Highnam, DARPA's deputy director. "The intent is to get researchers on contract quickly to test the value and feasibility of innovative concepts. Where we're successful, individual projects could lead to larger research and development programs spurring major AI breakthroughs."