How the internet found a better way than illegible squiggles to prove you're not a robot

The Guardian

The experience of squinting at distorted text, puzzling over small images, or even simply clicking on a checkbox to prove you aren't a robot could soon be over, if a new Google service takes off. The company has revealed the latest evolution of the Captcha (short, sort of, for Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart), which aims to do away with any interruption at all: the new, "invisible reCaptcha" aims to tell whether a given visitor is a robot or not purely by analysing their browsing behaviour. Barring a short wait while the system does its job, a typical human visitor shouldn't have to do anything else to prove they're not a robot. It's a long way from the first Captchas, introduced to stop automated programs signing up for services like email addresses and social media accounts. The idea is simple: pick a task that a human can do easily, and a machine finds very hard, and require that task be completed before the process can be continued.


Google's reCAPTCHA test has been tricked by artificial intelligence

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Computer scientists have found a way around Google's reCAPTCHA tests, tricking the system into thinking an artificial intelligence program is human. But there's a catch, although the AI system can fool the bot test it doesn't live-up to the promise its creators give it. CAPTCHAs are the tests used by websites to battle back against bots, asking website visitors to prove they're human before proceeding. The leading system is Google's reCAPTCHA, which has previously asked website visitors to prove their humanity by checking words scanned from books or photographs of street signs. That was replaced with behavioural analysis, requiring humans to simply tick a box proclaiming "I'm not a robot".


Artificial intelligence fools security

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Computer scientists have developed artificial intelligence that can outsmart the Captcha website security check system. Captcha challenges people to prove they are human by recognising combinations of letters and numbers that machines would struggle to complete correctly. Researchers developed an algorithm that imitates how the human brain responds to these visual clues. The neural network could identify letters and numbers from their shapes. The research, conducted by Vicarious - a Californian artificial intelligence firm funded by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg - is published in the journal Science.


Artificial intelligence fools security

#artificialintelligence

Computer scientists have developed artificial intelligence that can outsmart the Captcha website security check system. Captcha challenges people to prove they are human by recognising combinations of letters and numbers that machines would struggle to complete correctly. Researchers developed an algorithm that imitates how the human brain responds to these visual clues. The neural network could identify letters and numbers from their shapes. The research, conducted by Vicarious - a Californian artificial intelligence firm funded by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg - is published in the journal Science.