Why big data is good for your health - SWI swissinfo.ch

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Most patients have spent years bouncing from one doctor to another, building up huge dossiers of medical notes. Rare diseases typically take at least five years to correctly name, and sometimes up to 30, by which time it can be too late for effective treatment. "This is an inefficient, costly business," Dr Jurgen Schafer, who heads the German university's medical team, said at a media conference at IBM Zurich in October. "The computer is not going to replace the physician. But with this amount of data, it is completely clear that we don't need more physicians – we need more computer power."


Why big data is good for your health - SWI swissinfo.ch

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At the University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg 6,000 patients are waiting for a diagnosis of their rare conditions. Most patients have spent years bouncing from one doctor to another, building up huge dossiers of medical notes. Rare diseases typically take at least five years to correctly name, and sometimes up to 30, by which time it can be too late for effective treatment. "This is an inefficient, costly business," Dr Jurgen Schafer, who heads the German university's medical team, said at a media conference at IBM Zurich in October. "The computer is not going to replace the physician.


The truth about artificial intelligence in medicine

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For many months, artificial intelligence has been in my peripheral vision, just sitting there, ignored by me because it seemed too far in the future to be interesting now. And then, there were all these terms -- Big Data, machine learning, data science -- which circled the subject and, frankly, gave me a bit of a headache. Artificial intelligence is upon us, unleashed and unbridled in its ability to transform the world. If in the previous technological revolution, machines were invented to do the physical work, then in this revolution, machines are being invented to do the thinking work. And no field involves more thinking than medicine.


17 Ways Data Science Is Demystifying the Unknown

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Data scientists tackle questions about the future. They start with big data, characterized by the three V's: volume, variety and velocity. Then, they use it as fodder for algorithms and models. The most cutting-edge data scientists, working in machine learning and AI, make models that automatically self-improve, noting and learning from their mistakes. Data scientists have changed almost every industry. In medicine, their algorithms help predict patient side effects.


Data mining, text mining, natural language processing, and computational linguistics: some definitions

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Every once in a while an innocuous technical term suddenly enters public discourse with a bizarrely negative connotation. I first noticed the phenomenon some years ago, when I saw a Republican politician accusing Hillary Clinton of "parsing." From the disgust with which he said it, he clearly seemed to feel that parsing was morally equivalent to puppy-drowning. It seemed quite odd to me, since I'd only ever heard the word "parse" used to refer to the computer analysis of sentence structures. The most recent word to suddenly find itself stigmatized by Republicans (yes, it does somehow always seem to be Republican politicians who are involved in this particular kind of linguistic bullshittery) is "encryption."