Is YOUR job at risk? White House report warns AI could soon leave 'millions' of Americans unemployed

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The increase AI will leave millions of Americans unemployed in the next coming years, reveals a new report from the White House. Dubai police launch AI that can spot crimes BEFORE they... What humans will look like in 100 years: Expert reveals the... How an'emotional hangover' shapes your memory: Effects of... Tesla and Panasonic join forces to begin solar panel... Dubai police launch AI that can spot crimes BEFORE they... What humans will look like in 100 years: Expert reveals the... How an'emotional hangover' shapes your memory: Effects of... Tesla and Panasonic join forces to begin solar panel... The White House report cites a 2013 study from Oxford University that says a whopping 47 percent of jobs are at risk.Softbank's humanoid robot Pepper (pictured) introduces Nestle's coffee machines at an electric shop in Tokyo However, the report suggests AI could improve the country's productivity growth, which would result in higher wages and fewer work hours. YOU'RE AT MORE RISK IF YOU MAKE LESS THAN $20 AN HOUR Hero dog saves his injured'girlfriend' on deadly railway track Fox Valley Mall forced to close as huge brawl breaks out Chaos as people rush out of NJ mall after reports of gunshots Adorable puppy is constantly bumped on the head by playful kitten CAT ATTACK: Pet pounces on man as he opens Christmas present Just beautiful! Kaylee Rodgers stuns internet singing Hallelujah Grizzly bear attacks TV woman who recklessly tries to stroke it President-elect Donald Trump cheered as he attends church Father posts awkward video invitation to his daughter's Quinceañera Mayhem outside Fox Valley Mall as police make several arrests Prince William & Duchess of Cambridge arrive at church service Ten-year-old girl's emotional reaction to puppy surprise!


World's first driverless Tesla taxis to arrive in Dubai

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The world's first fleet of self-driving cars could be deployed thousands of miles from where they were invented. The city of Dubai will have 200 of Tesla's self-driving, electric taxis on its roads by 2020. The cars will initially be used on'autopilot', meaning a human driver has to be behind the wheel for emergencies, but will come with the hardware needed for full self-driving capability. The world's first fleet of self-driving cars could be deployed a long way from where they were invented. The city of Dubai will have 200 self-driving Tesla taxis, including Tesla's Model S pictured here, on its roads by 2020 Tesla announced an updated version of their autopilot hardware in December last year, named HW2.


Has Hyperloop One bitten off more than it can chew?

Engadget

"I don't want to be remembered as the guy that put a train in a tube" is the quote du jour from Hyperloop One's Josh Giegel. Giegel and co-founder Shervin Pishevar have been showing off a revised vision for how the future of public transportation will operate that moves far beyond intercity travel. But does this level of futurism run the risk of alienating governments and regulators who just want a cheap alternative to high-speed rail? We sat down with the pair to ask them to justify their even more utopian vision for the future of travel. The company's latest pitch video demonstrates this, showing how a route between Dubai and Abu Dhabi would work.


The Transport Systems Of Science Fiction Will Be Here Sooner Than You Think

Huffington Post - Tech news and opinion

By 2020, self-driving cars will have progressed so far that they can drive safely at speeds as fast as 200 mph in their own partitioned lanes on highways. In these circumstances, the commute to Los Angeles from San Francisco would take only an hour and a half -- without the need to catch a connection to a supersonic pod. From Abu Dhabi to Al Ain or Dubai could take the car 30 to 40 minutes, door to door. In other words, Elon Musk's self-driving cars and HTT's short-haul Hyperloops may be competing with each other. I'm one of those who would prefer the convenience of having their car come with them so that they can keep extra stuff in the back and be working uninterrupted on the commute.


Inside Shenzhen's race to outdo Silicon Valley

MIT Technology Review

Every day at around 4 p.m., the creeeek criikkk of stretched packing tape echoes through Huaqiangbei, Shenzhen's sprawling neighborhood of hardware stores. Shopkeepers package up the day's sales--selfie sticks, fidget spinners, electric scooters, drones--and by 5, crowds of people are on the move at the rapid pace locals call Shenzhen sudu, or "Shenzhen speed," carting boxes out on motorcycles, trucks, and--if it's a light order--zippy balance boards. From Huaqiangbei the boxes are brought to the depots of global logistics companies and loaded onto airplanes and cargo ships. In the latter case they join 24 million metric tons of container cargo going out every month from Shekou harbor--literally "snake's mouth," the world's third-busiest shipping port after Shanghai and Singapore. A few days or weeks later, the boxes arrive in destinations as nearby as Manila and Phnom Penh and as far afield as Dubai, Buenos Aires, Lagos, and Berlin.