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Why everyone from students to NASA is using this Canadian invention

#artificialintelligence

Maplesoft offers AI-backed technology that can help students solve math problems. Our brains have long relied on machines to help with mathematics – calculators being the most obvious example. Waterloo, Ont.-based Maplesoft offers AI-backed technology that can help students solve math problems, check their homework and explore graphs in 3-D within seconds. "Our mission is to just make math more accessible," says Karishma Punwani, Maplesoft's director of academic products. "We want to change the way students view, learn and access math to help them see the awe in it." The Canadian-built technology isn't only used in the classroom: Maplesoft's software is also used by engineers and researchers at organizations such as Google, NASA, the Canadian Space Agency and research labs around the world.


AI Will Put 10 Million Jobs At High Risk -- More Than Were Eliminated By The Great Recession

#artificialintelligence

Automation is coming after jobs, from fast food workers to accountants. We analyzed which jobs are most -- and least -- at risk, given factors including tasks involved, the current commercial deployment of technology, patent activity, regulations, and more. The shift from traditional manufacturing to computer-enabled industry took nearly a century. But the shift from personal computing to billions of smartphones, massive networks, and the IoT has taken just a couple of decades. And the next phase of technological evolution is already underway: advanced neural networks that learn, adapt, and respond to situations. With AI and automation advancing at a breakneck pace, society's capacity to respond is being stretched to the limit. Cities are seeing front-end automated restaurants like Eatsa gaining popularity, while in factories automation has already arguably been a part of life for years (if not decades) in the form of heavy industrial and agricultural robots. Analyzing the automation landscape, we found that 10 million service and warehouse jobs are at high risk of displacement within the next 5 – 10 years in the US alone. Meanwhile, nearly 5 million retail workers are at a medium risk of automation within 10 years. To put these numbers into perspective, estimates are that over a few years the Great Recession of 2007 – 2010 destroyed 8.7 million jobs in the US.


AI Will Put 10 Million Jobs At High Risk -- More Than Were Eliminated By The Great Recession

#artificialintelligence

We analyzed which jobs are most -- and least -- at risk, given factors including tasks involved, the current commercial deployment of technology, patent activity, regulations, and more. Meanwhile, several big corporations have open sourced their AI software libraries in recent years -- another major accelerant for AI. Our time frame was the next 5-10 years, and the relative risk of automation was based on factors including tasks involved, current commercial deployment of technology, patent activity, investment activity, technological challenges, and regulations. Google Ventures and Khosla Ventures recently funded burger-flipping robot Mometum Machines (funding and patents below).


Productivity boost? Robots break new ground in the construction industry

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Robots have moved into factories, warehouses, stores and even our homes. Tech startups are developing self-driving bulldozers, drones to inspect work sites and robot bricklayers. In this photo taken Jan. 26, 2018, Mike Moy, an assistant plant manager for Lehigh Hanson Cement Group, inspects a Kespry drone he uses to survey inventories of rock, sand and other building materials at a mining plant in Sunol, California. Robots are coming to a construction site near you. Tech startups are developing self-driving bulldozers, survey drones and bricklaying robots to help the construction industry boost productivity, speed and safety as it struggles to find enough skilled workers.


Hardhat bots takeover construction sites

Robohub

RobotLabNYC's third installment will be on June 13, in New York City with Howard Morgan (FirstRound Capital) and Tom Ryden (MassRobotics); together, we will be "Exploring The Autonomous Future" (RSVP today). Coincidentally, Jimmy Fallon featured a new bit this week called "Showbotics," providing viewers with a sneak peek into the robotic future: While Fallon pokes fun, the reality is that robots today are showing up for work in record numbers. As America pulls out of NAFTA and starts a trade war with Canada over lumber imports, it is predicted that home building costs could increase by more than 20% over the next year. In order to keep America building without sacrificing margin, labor is shifting from humans with tool belts to job-ready robots. An example of machines being added to the field is MIT's Digital Construction Platform (DCP) – a 3D-printing fabrication robot.