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International Business Times

President Donald Trump announced his decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris Climate Agreement. "In order to fulfill my solemn duty to protect America and its citizens, the United States will withdraw from the Paris climate accord." Prior to announcing his decision, Florida Congresswoman Debbie Waserman Shultz took to Twitter to say "withdrawing from the Paris Agreement would be among the most destructive decisions of Donald Trump's presidency." Celebrities, non-public people, and politicians alike have been vocal about Trump's "destructive" decision on Twitter.


US TO EXIT PARIS PACT Trump: US to leave climate agreement, calls it 'unfair'

FOX News

After days of drama and suspense, President Trump announced Thursday that his administration will exit the Paris climate agreement. "So we're getting out," Trump said. "The Paris accord is very unfair at the highest level to the United States." Trump's decision fulfills a campaign promise and satisfies strong Republican opposition to the global climate deal but isolates the U.S. and is certain to bring condemnation from world leaders and critics in the scientific community. Critics of the Paris agreement argue it hurts the economy but supporters say it will create jobs down the line.


The Latest: Scientist warns US climate move short-sighted

Associated Press

President Donald Trump walks to the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Thursday, June 1, 2017, after speaking in the Rose Garden about the US role in the Paris climate change accord. President Donald Trump walks to the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Thursday, June 1, 2017, after speaking in the Rose Garden about the US role in the Paris climate change accord. Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, center right, and European Council President Donald Tusk, center left, arrive for a round table meeting at an EU-China summit in Brussels, on Friday, June 2, 2017.


Paris climate deal: US denies it will stay in accord

BBC News

The US has insisted it will leave the Paris climate accord, despite reports that it may be softening its stance. Officials who met a White House representative on Saturday said afterwards the US would either stay in the 2015 accord or change its approach. The White House said "there has been no change" in the US position "unless we can re-enter on terms that are more favourable to our country". President Donald Trump said in June he wanted a new "fair" deal for the US. He added it was important a new deal would not disadvantage US businesses, but opponents say withdrawing from the accord is an abdication of US leadership on a key global challenge.


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Associated Press

President Donald Trump speaks about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. President Donald Trump speaks about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. Administration officials, from left, White House chief strategist Steve Bannon, Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt, and Vice President Mike Pence, applaud as President Donald Trump announces that the U.S. will withdraw from the Paris climate change accord as he speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in Washington. Protesters gather outside the White House in Washington, Thursday, June 1, 2017, to protest President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw the Unites States from the Paris climate change accord.