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Microsoft Corporation : Technology Stocks Continue to Outperform in 2017: Latest Reports on Microsoft and Paypal Post Earnings 4-Traders

#artificialintelligence

NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / January 27, 2017 / The Technology sector was the largest gainer in the S&P 500 Index in 2016 and that rally has continued into 2017. The tech-focused Nasdaq Composite Index has risen approximately 5.05 percent year-to-date, compared to a gain of 1.71 percent for the Dow Jones Industrial Average. The S&P 500 Index has gained 2.58 percent in 2017, with the S&P 500 Information Technology Sector up 5.5 percent. "The tech rally is firmly in place," said Tim Bajarin, principal analyst with Campbell-based Creative Strategies, a market researcher that tracks the technology sector. "Wall Street is coming to grips about how technology impacts every aspect of our lives and is critical to the success of business."


The crisis in Indian ecommerce

ZDNet

One of the most memorable events in investing that I remember from the mid to late 1990s was a competition organized by the Wall Street Journal newspaper in New York, which pitched the country's best analysts and investors against picks generated by random throws on a dartboard. Astonishingly, the dartboard trumped the analysts on numerous occasions and I can't help but liken it to what is happening on the Indian venture capital front. Venture investing of course is not stock market investing, but it does involve some of the same rigours and expertise -- how to read numbers and evaluate industry and competitive landscapes and then use this along with judgement, analysis, and gut feel to gauge the future business potential of companies to make current bets. In doing so, venture investors have performed abysmally in India. If there were a new equivalent to that dartboard -- say an artificial intelligence bot that actually used all of the market intelligence and disruptive potential of a business idea plugged into it, as some investors have begun to do recently -- I am quite sure that it would be a no-contest.


Amazon, Other E-Commerce Sites Spark Bull Market For Warehouses

International Business Times

With Amazon and other e-commerce sites continuing to take market share from malls and other physical retailers, U.S. mutual fund managers are upping their bets on an overlooked part of the online shopping boom: warehouses. Real estate investment trusts (REITs) that own the distribution centers required to fill all those Amazon Prime boxes are a growing favorite on Wall Street after two years of underperformance compared with the broad real estate market. In large part, the move comes about because of changes in the supply chains of online retail giants like Amazon.com Inc. over the last few years as they focus on fast, two-day shipping. Whereas a traditional retailer might send a pallet full of merchandise to a store, online shippers send out individual packages. That requires significantly more space to hold greater amounts of inventory on hand and to route all those boxes, said Eric Frankel, an analyst at research firm Green Street Advisors.


Mathematical Foundations for Social Computing

Communications of the ACM

Yiling Chen (yiling@seas.harvard.edu) is Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. Arpita Ghosh (arpitaghosh@cornell.edu) is an associate professor of information science at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. Michael Kearns (mkearns@cis.upenn.edu) is a professor and National Center Chair of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Tim Roughgarden (tim@cs.stanford.edu) is an associate professor of CS at Stanford University, Stanford, CA. Jennifer Wortman Vaughan (jenn@microsoft.com) is a senior researcher at Microsoft Research, New York, NY.


Bracing for Amazon HQ2: Virginia, New York communities await e-commerce giant

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Just like a bad break up, we point out the flaws that Amazon saw in your city's bid for their second headquarters. A view of the waterfront of Long Island City in the Queens borough of New York, along the East River, is seen Nov. 7, 2018. Amazon has decided to split its new headquarters between New York City and a Washington suburb in Northern Virginia, The Wall Street Journal reported, Nov. 12, 2018. After a year-long search in which more than 200 cities wooed the web giant for the project Amazon opted to divvy up its so-called HQ2 between the Long Island City neighborhood of Queens in New York and the Crystal City area of Arlington, Virginia, across the Potomac River from Washington. Residents of the two cities that won the Amazon headquarters lottery are bracing for the good, the bad and the ugly when the mammoth e-commerce company comes to their towns.