Keep Your Thinking Machines, I'll Take Human-Computer Interaction Any Day

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It's hard to discuss the role of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the workplace until you decide what AI is. Some academics tell us -- using lots of words -- that AI is computers that think, learn and ultimately act like humans while others hold that maximizing the interaction between computers and their humans -- such as in Human Computer Interaction or HCI -- qualifies as the closest thing to AI we are likely to see. Until you decide on which side of that dichotomy you fall, it's difficult to understand how, or if, AI contributes to business, and if so, how to improve its contributions. Our fascination with the idea of machines that think like humans goes back millennia, but it's only recently that it appears to potentially be in reach. And while AI research has uncovered some amazing technological capabilities, it has also run into a quagmire in its attempts to 1) agree on just what human intelligence is; and 2) the extent to which technology might be capable of replicating it.


Elon Musk, DeepMind and AI researchers promise not to develop robot killing machines

The Independent - Tech

Elon Musk and many of the world's most respected artificial intelligence researchers have committed not to build autonomous killer robots. The public pledge not to make any "lethal autonomous weapons" comes amid increasing concern about how machine learning and AI will be used on the battlefields of the future. The signatories to the new pledge – which includes the founders of DeepMind, a founder of Skype, and leading academics from across the industry – promise that they will not allow the technology they create to be used to help create killing machines. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.


Volkswagen and NVIDIA want to help humans and robots work together

Engadget

After just confirming its plans to help Volvo create self-driving cars, NVIDIA has now revealed that it's also working with another leading car manufacturer. Announcing a partnership with Volkswagen, the tech company states its artificial intelligence and deep learning tech will be used to help VW expand its AI business beyond just autonomous vehicles. While this collaboration may sound surprising, the move actually looks to help expand Volkswagen's existing AI-focused research division - The VW Data Lab. The two companies have suggested that this sharing of tech could be used to help the pair optimize traffic flow in cities and even to devise solutions that make human and robot collaboration easier. In a statement, Volkswagen's CIO Dr. Martin Hofmann says that AI is "the key to the digital future of the Volkswagen Group" describing its collaboration with NVIDIA as "a major step" in expanding the company's proficiency in the field.


Elon Musk's Billion-Dollar Crusade to Stop the A.I. Apocalypse

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It was just a friendly little argument about the fate of humanity. Demis Hassabis, a leading creator of advanced artificial intelligence, was chatting with Elon Musk, a leading doomsayer, about the perils of artificial intelligence. They are two of the most consequential and intriguing men in Silicon Valley who don't live there. Hassabis, a co-founder of the mysterious London laboratory DeepMind, had come to Musk's SpaceX rocket factory, outside Los Angeles, a few years ago. They were in the canteen, talking, as a massive rocket part traversed overhead.


Why many important minds have subscribed to the existential risk of AI

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Elon Musk has been sounding the alarms about the existential risk of the human species due to Artificial Intelligence. He's a brilliant leader and has one of the sharpest minds in the public eye, so for him to be alarmed about a field I work in and sense no such existential risk has caused considerable cognitive dissonance. My instinctive disagreement with someone of his stature, along with people like Nick Bostrom, Stephen Hawkins, and Bill Gates made me curious. Nick Bostrom wrote the best seller Super Intelligence that describes a world where machine intelligence dominates human intelligence and ends in our extinction. As bleak as this world view is, Bostrom approaches it with reason and with loose timelines.