Greek merger aimed at developing digital green solutions for shipping -

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A Greek maritime environmental engineering company has merged with a well known local shipping IT firm with the pair vowing to develop green digital solutions for the industry. Erma First, best known for its ballast water treatment systems, has bought out METIS Cyberspace Technology from the Germanos–led Olympia Group. Established in 2016, METIS is specialised in electronic engineering, IoT, cloud computing and artificial intelligence, offering a platform that enables shipping companies to acquire and analyse data to improve performance over a wide range of operational aspects. "With technology playing an increasingly critical role in every aspect of the industry, both companies recognize that they need to accelerate the development of green digital solutions to ensure they remain in the competitive vanguard," the companies said in a statement. Starting out with the Informa Group in 2000 in Hong Kong, Sam Chambers became editor of Maritime Asia magazine as well as East Asia Editor for the world's oldest newspaper, Lloyd's List.


Greek merger aimed at developing digital green solutions for shipping -

#artificialintelligence

A Greek maritime environmental engineering company has merged with a well known local shipping IT firm with the pair vowing to develop green digital solutions for the industry. Erma First, best known for its ballast water treatment systems, has bought out METIS Cyberspace Technology from the Germanos–led Olympia Group. Established in 2016, METIS is specialised in electronic engineering, IoT, cloud computing and artificial intelligence, offering a platform that enables shipping companies to acquire and analyse data to improve performance over a wide range of operational aspects. "With technology playing an increasingly critical role in every aspect of the industry, both companies recognize that they need to accelerate the development of green digital solutions to ensure they remain in the competitive vanguard," the companies said in a statement. Starting out with the Informa Group in 2000 in Hong Kong, Sam Chambers became editor of Maritime Asia magazine as well as East Asia Editor for the world's oldest newspaper, Lloyd's List.


Purifying the Goddess

The New Yorker

The Ganges River begins in the Himalayas, roughly three hundred miles north of Delhi and five miles south of India's border with Tibet, where it emerges from an ice cave called Gaumukh (the Cow's Mouth) and is known as the Bhagirathi. Eleven miles downstream, gray-blue with glacial silt, it reaches the small temple town of Gangotri. Some swallow mouthfuls of the icy water, which they call amrit--nectar. Women in bright saris wade out into the water, filling small plastic flasks to take home. Indians living abroad can buy a bottle of it on Amazon or on eBay for 9.99. To hundreds of millions of Hindus, in India and around the world, the Ganges is not just a river but also a goddess, Ganga, who was brought down to Earth from her home in the Milky Way by Lord Shiva, flowing through his dreadlocks to break the force of her fall. The sixteenth-century Mogul emperor Akbar called it "the water of immortality," and insisted on serving it at court. In 1615, Nicholas Withington, one of the earliest English travellers in India, wrote that water from the Ganges "will never stinke, though kepte never so longe, neyther will anye wormes or vermine breede therein." The myth persists that the river has a self-purifying quality--sometimes ascribed to sulfur springs, or to high levels of natural radioactivity in the Himalayan headwaters, or to the presence of bacteriophages, viruses that can destroy bacteria. Below Gangotri, the river's path is one of increasing degradation. Its banks are disfigured by small hydropower stations, some half built, and by diversion tunnels, blasted out of solid rock, that leave miles of the riverbed dry. The towering hydroelectric dam at Tehri, which began operating in 2006, releases a flood or a dribble or nothing at all, depending on the vagaries of the season and the fluctuating demands of the power grid. The first significant human pollution begins at Uttarkashi, seventy miles or so from the source of the river.


How IoT Solutions Can Improve Waste Management Processes

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Waste disposal is a huge challenge for major cities. Today, government administrations in smart cities like Singapore, Dubai, Hong Kong, Amsterdam, Stockholm, Tokyo, Melbourne, Seattle, Chicago and Seoul have provided a massive push to incorporate technology into every aspect of their cities. The waste disposal process in many of these cities has transformed into a highly smart operation management activity. Today, civic waste management of any smart city is an interplay of on-field devices, or sensors, networked together to generate millions of data points; data thus obtained is then ingested into a cloud platform and fed through complex analytical frameworks to analyze and then to derive sensible, actionable inferences to better serve the citizens of that city. The whole process is automated with almost zero human interference.


China aims to double water transfers from wet south to arid north

The Japan Times

SHANGHAI – China aims to double the amount of water it transfers from the flood-prone south to arid northern regions, officials said Thursday, as the government prepares to launch the second phase of its controversial cross-country water diversion program. The South-North Water Diversion Project was first proposed in 1952 to ease flooding in the south and drought in the north, but critics say its costs are too high and the diversion of polluted water to other regions could contaminate other lakes and rivers. The first phase of the project, completed five years ago, linked the Yangtze and Yellow rivers through two main routes in eastern and central China, with another, more challenging route in the far west still to come. Preliminary work is now under way on the second phase, which will raise annual delivery capacity from 8.77 billion cubic meters to 16.5 billion cubic meters, said Shi Chunxian, head of the planning office of the Ministry of Water Resources. Shi told reporters that phase II would supply the provinces of Anhui and Shandong as well as regions around Beijing, adding that China will make full use of existing infrastructure to minimize the expansion's environmental impact.