Transforming Big Data into Meaningful Insights - insideBIGDATA

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In this special guest feature, Marc Alacqua, CEO and founding partner of Signafire, discusses a useful approach to data – known as data fusion – which is essentially alchemy-squared, turning not just one but multiple raw materials in to something greater than the sum of their parts. It goes beyond older methods of big data analysis, like data integration, in which large data sets are simply thrown together in one environment. Marc is a decorated combat veteran of the U.S. Army Special Operations Forces. For his service during Operation Iraqi Freedom, he was cited for "exceptionally conspicuous gallantry" and awarded two Bronze Star Medals and the Army Commendation Medal for Valor. A 20-year veteran and Lieutenant Colonel, Marc has extensive command experience in both combat and peace time, having commanded airborne and light infantry as well as special operations units.


How AI and machine learning are transforming clinical decision support

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"Between 12 to 18 million Americans every year will experience some sort of diagnostic error," said Paul Cerrato, a journalist and researcher. "So the question is: Why such a huge number? And what can we do better in terms of reinventing the tools so they catch these conditions more effectively?" Cerrato is co-author, alongside Dr. John Halamka, newly minted president of Mayo Clinic Platform, of the new HIMSS Book Series edition, Reinventing Clinical Decision Support: Data Analytics, Artificial Intelligence, and Diagnostic Reasoning. At HIMSS20, the two of them will discuss the book, and the bigger picture around CDS tools that are fast being transformed by the advent of artificial intelligence, machine learning and big data analytics.


How Artificial Intelligence Predicts Life-Threatening Brain Disorders Analytics Insight

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Big data, artificial intelligence and machine learning are ruling the tech structure of most industries. We all know how Amazon combines a customer's historical data and other customers' data to power recommendations. Likewise, for Google, it's not difficult to predict our preferences and interests. They make use of big data, analytics and machine learning to be able to process huge amounts of data, identify patterns, analyze them and consequently indulge in predictive analysis. The most complicated disease of the most important organ of the body – the brain, is a clear beneficiary of this AI approach.


Developing a NLP based PR platform for the Canadian Elections

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Elections are a vital part of democracy allowing people to vote for the candidate they think can best lead the country. A candidate's campaign aims to demonstrate to the public why they think they are the best choice. However, in this age of constant media coverage and digital communications, the candidate is scrutinized at every step. A single misquote or negative news about a candidate can be the difference between him winning or losing the election. It becomes crucial to have a public relations manager who can guide and direct the candidate's campaign by prioritizing specific campaign activities. One critical aspect of the PR manager's work is to understand the public perception of their candidate and improve public sentiment about the candidate.


Detecting Cyberattack Entities from Audit Data via Multi-View Anomaly Detection with Feedback

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In this paper, we consider the problem of detecting unknown cyberattacks from audit data of system-level events. A key challenge is that different cyberattacks will have different suspicion indicators, which are not known beforehand. To address this we consider a multi-view anomaly detection framework, where multiple expert-designed ``views" of the data are created for capturing features that may serve as potential indicators. Anomaly detectors are then applied to each view and the results are combined to yield an overall suspiciousness ranking of system entities. Unfortunately, there is often a mismatch between what anomaly detection algorithms find and what is actually malicious, which can result in many false positives. This problem is made even worse in the multi-view setting, where only a small subset of the views may be relevant to detecting a particular cyberattack. To help reduce the false positive rate, a key contribution of this paper is to incorporate feedback from security analysts about whether proposed suspicious entities are of interest or likely benign. This feedback is incorporated into subsequent anomaly detection in order to improve the suspiciousness ranking toward entities that are truly of interest to the analyst. For this purpose, we propose an easy to implement variant of the perceptron learning algorithm, which is shown to be quite effective on benchmark datasets. We evaluate our overall approach on real attack data from a DARPA red team exercise, which include multiple attacks on multiple operating systems. The results show that the incorporation of feedback can significantly reduce the time required to identify malicious system entities.