'Forgotten' Brain Region Rediscovered a Century Later

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A drawing of a postmortem brain that includes the vertical occipital fasciculus (bottom left) published by neuroscientist E.J. Curran in 1909. A major pathway of the human brain involved in visual perception, attention and movement -- and overlooked by many researchers for more than a century -- is finally getting its moment in the sun. In 2012, researchers made note of a pathway in a region of the brain associated with reading, but "we couldn't find it in any atlas," said Jason Yeatman, a research scientist at the University of Washington's Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences. "We'd thought we had discovered a new pathway that no one else had noticed before." A quick investigation showed that the pathway, known as the vertical occipital fasciculus (VOF), was not actually unknown.


Scientists use AI to predict why children struggle at school

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Washington DC, [USA] Sep 30 (ANI): Scientists using machine learning - a type of artificial intelligence - with data from hundreds of children who struggle at school, identified clusters of learning difficulties. Researchers from the Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit at the University of Cambridge said that this reinforces the need for children to receive a detailed assessment of their cognitive skills to identify the best type of support. The study recruited 550 children who were referred to a clinic because they were struggling at school. The scientists said that much of the previous research into learning difficulties have focused on children who had already been given a particular diagnosis, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), an autism spectrum disorder, or dyslexia. By including children with all difficulties- regardless of diagnosis-this study better captured the range of difficulties.


'AI may help predict why children struggle at school'

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LONDON, Oct 1: Using machine learning – a type of artificial intelligence (AI) – could help develop better predictions of why children struggle at school, scientists say. The researchers from the University of Cambridge in the UK used AI and data from hundreds of children who struggle at school to identify clusters of learning difficulties which did not match the previous diagnosis the children had been given. The finding, published in the journal Developmental Science, reinforces the need for children to receive detailed assessments of their cognitive skills to identify the best type of support. The researchers recruited 550 children who were referred to a clinic because they were struggling at school. Much of the previous research into learning difficulties has focussed on children who had already been given a particular diagnosis, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), an autism spectrum disorder, or dyslexia, they said.


Artificial Intelligence may help predict why children struggle at school

#artificialintelligence

Using machine learning - a type of artificial intelligence (AI) - could help develop better predictions of why children struggle at school, scientists say. The researchers from the University of Cambridge in the UK used AI and data from hundreds of children who struggle at school to identify clusters of learning difficulties which did not match the previous diagnosis the children had been given. The finding, published in the journal Developmental Science, reinforces the need for children to receive detailed assessments of their cognitive skills to identify the best type of support. The researchers recruited 550 children who were referred to a clinic because they were struggling at school. Much of the previous research into learning difficulties has focussed on children who had already been given a particular diagnosis, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), an autism spectrum disorder, or dyslexia, they said.


Dyslexia Linked to Brain Communication Breakdown

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Dyslexia may be caused by impaired connections between auditory and speech centers of the brain, according to a study published today in Science. The research could help to resolve conflicting theories about the root causes of the disorder, and lead to targeted interventions. When people learn to read, their brains make connections between written symbols and components of spoken words. But people with dyslexia seem to have difficulty identifying and manipulating the speech sounds to be linked to written symbols. Researchers have long debated whether the underlying representations of these sounds are disrupted in the dyslexic brain, or whether they are intact but language-processing centers are simply unable to access them properly.