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Machine learning in information security: Getting started - Help Net Security

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Machine learning (ML) technologies and solutions are expected to become a prominent feature of the information security landscape, as both attackers and defenders turn to artificial intelligence to achieve their goals. "The advent of machine learning in security comes alongside the increased capability for collecting and analyzing massive datasets on user behavior, client characteristics, network communications, and more. As we have already witnessed in many other technological domains, I think machine learning will become the main driver for innovation in information security in the coming decade," says security researcher Clarence Chio. Alongside Anto Joseph, a security engineer at Intel, Chio is scheduled to give Hack In The Box attendees a quick and practical introduction to the world of machine learning in April. But, he says in advance, machine learning is no silver bullet.


Bridging the Gap: Machine Learning & Cloud Security

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The growing hype around machine learning technology seems to be creeping into every aspect of enterprise IT and cyber security is no different. Defined as a way to provide computers with the ability to learn without the need for programming, the term Machine Learning seems to be this year's big buzzword. In fact today you'd be hard-pressed to find a security vendor that doesn't claim to incorporate some form of machine learning or AI technology into their threat prevention solution. So how much is true and how much is smoke and mirrors? Despite being a concept first envisioned back in the 1950s by Alan Turing, the lack of computing power has held research teams from making any significant jump towards realising the technology.


Egypt campus: The students versus the regime

Al Jazeera

In the wake of the 2013 military coup, students affiliated with - and sympathetic to - the Muslim Brotherhood demonstrated in public universities to demand the return of the deposed President Mohamed Morsi. Their demonstrations turned universities into a new battleground between security forces and students as Egypt's new rulers moved to crackdown on student activism. Egypt's ruling generals have used laws, regulations, procedures, and security tools to subdue student dissidents. The government has employed private security companies to patrol public university campuses and pushed university administrations to enforce harsh penalties against non-compliant students. The general prosecutor has transferred hundreds of student dissidents to criminal courts and even more have remained in police detention.


AI, Machine Learning to Reach $47 Billion by 2020

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According to the IBM Institute of Business Value (IBV), cognitive solutions are already seeing widespread adoption in other industries. Yet the security community is still in the early stages of pioneering cognitive security systems. Today, only 7% of security professionals claim to be using cognitive technologies--and a lack of internal skills in the area and competency are the main obstacles, both cited by 45% of respondents. That said, 21% said their organizations plan to use these solutions in the next two to three years--meaning that the use of cognitive security is set to triple within the next few years. Ironically, the staffing challenge is also a driver: "The 24/7 nature of security operations presents a challenge that is costly for most organizations to staff, which is where the appeal of cognitive-enabled security comes in--it never sleeps or fatigues," said Michael Pinch, CISO, University of Rochester, in the report.


AI, Machine Learning to Reach $47 Billion by 2020

#artificialintelligence

Cognitive systems are driving $8 billion in revenue in 2016--and the space, which includes artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, is slated to become a $47 billion industry by 2020. According to the IBM Institute of Business Value (IBV), cognitive solutions are already seeing widespread adoption in other industries. Yet the security community is still in the early stages of pioneering cognitive security systems. Today, only 7% of security professionals claim to be using cognitive technologies--and a lack of internal skills in the area and competency are the main obstacles, both cited by 45% of respondents. That said, 21% said their organizations plan to use these solutions in the next two to three years--meaning that the use of cognitive security is set to triple within the next few years.