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Big data in agriculture focus of Houston conference Aug. 20-21 AgriLife Today

#artificialintelligence

HOUSTON – High-tech devices in agriculture such as unmanned aerial vehicles and sensors are leading to immense growth in data collection and deployment, and a Houston conference Aug. 20-21 will feature scholars and industry experts discussing future applications in all aspects of production agriculture. Identifying Obstacles to Applying Big Data in Agriculture will be held Aug. The invitation-only conference, Identifying Obstacles to Applying Big Data in Agriculture, will be held at the Houston Airport Marriott at George Bush Intercontinental Airport. It is sponsored by Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the U.S. Department of Agriculture- National Institute of Food and Agriculture. "We have had advanced technologies like GPS in agriculture for over 20 years, but only a small handful of these technologies have made a significant impact," said Dr. Alex Thomasson, conference coordinator and Texas A&M AgriLife Research engineer in College Station.


Big data in agriculture focus of Houston conference Aug. 20-21

#artificialintelligence

HOUSTON – High-tech devices in agriculture such as unmanned aerial vehicles and sensors are leading to immense growth in data collection and deployment, and a Houston conference Aug. 20-21 will feature scholars and industry experts discussing future applications in all aspects of production agriculture. The invitation-only conference, Identifying Obstacles to Applying Big Data in Agriculture, will be held at the Houston Airport Marriott at George Bush Intercontinental Airport. It is sponsored by Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the U.S. Department of Agriculture- National Institute of Food and Agriculture. "We have had advanced technologies like GPS in agriculture for over 20 years, but only a small handful of these technologies have made a significant impact," said Dr. Alex Thomasson, conference coordinator and Texas A&M AgriLife Research engineer in College Station. "Thus we want to cast a vision for the practical use of big data in production agriculture so we can take advantage of the current wave of attendant technologies like the so-called Internet of Things, artificial intelligence, wireless communications, the cloud, etc. "This conference will feature discussion with key business leaders and academics involved in a broad range of disciplines within big data and precision agriculture.


Ag experts discuss handling big data in agriculture at Houston conference

#artificialintelligence

HOUSTON – Agricultural experts at a Houston conference praised the advancements in unmanned aerial vehicles, sensors and data-collecting technology used in precision crop production research, but said there are also challenges in how to process vast amounts of information and translate to the farmer. The conference, "Identifying Obstacles to Applying Big Data in Agriculture," held Aug. Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the U.S. Department of Agriculture-National Institute of Food and Agriculture were conference sponsors. "We need reliable data and to be asking the right questions," said Dr. Alex Thomasson, conference coordinator and Texas A&M AgriLife Research engineer. "A few agricultural trends as well as technology development in the broader economy have driven the advance of big-data technology use in agriculture."


Invasive Stink Bugs Plaguing Soybean Farmers in 3 States

U.S. News

Arkansas is the mid-South's biggest producer, with 3.5 million acres of the beans. Mississippi has more than 2 million acres, Louisiana 1.3 million. Farmers are finding normal to above-normal numbers of red-banded stink bugs west of Houston, but nothing like the infestations in Arkansas and Mississippi, said Mo Way, of the Texas A&M AgriLIFE Resarch Center at Beaumont.


Texas to feral pigs: It's time for the 'hog apocalypse' to begin

Mashable

Texas has a new plan for its 2.5 million feral hogs: total annihilation. Sid Miller, the state's agriculture commissioner, just approved a pesticide -- called "Kaput Feral Hog Lure" -- for statewide use. "The'hog apocalypse' may finally be on the horizon," Miller said in a statement on Tuesday. "This solution is long overdue," he added. "Wild hogs have caused extensive damage to Texas lands and loss of income for many, many years."