Los Porkys: The Sexual-Assault Case That's Shaking Mexico

The New Yorker

For several centuries, the port city of Veracruz, located in the Mexican state of the same name, was known for its carnival. Now, though, it's known for corruption and terror. The state has become territory for the fearsome Zeta drug cartel. According to a study by Mexico's bureau of statistics, eight out of ten people in the state say they live in fear. At least fifteen journalists have been killed in Veracruz since 2011. During the same period, hundreds of other people have vanished. Father Alejandro Solalinde, one of Mexico's leading human-rights advocates, has called Veracruz "a factory of forced disappearances."


Longtime NBC journalist Cecilia Alvear, who opened doors for Latinos and women, dies at 77

Los Angeles Times

Cecilia Alvear, a longtime television journalist and former president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists who crusaded for greater opportunities for young Latino journalists throughout her career, died Friday at her home in Santa Monica after battling breast cancer. Alvear had bounced around local Los Angeles news stations until 1982, when NBC hired her to run its Mexico City bureau. She remained at the network until her retirement in 2007. During that time Alvear covered wars and revolutions in El Salvador and Nicaragua, and produced multiple interviews with Cuban President Fidel Castro, said George Lewis, her partner of 23 years. "She would go into war zones and she would always insist on being with the camera crews because she felt that if she was sending those guys into danger she needed to share that with them," Lewis said.


Hacker claims he helped Enrique Peña Nieto win Mexican presidential election

The Guardian

A digital dark arts campaign by mercenary hackers helped Enrique Peña Nieto win Mexico's 2012 presidential election, according to an imprisoned Colombian hacker who says he was involved. Andrés Sepúlveda, an online campaign strategist, claimed he had also helped to manipulate elections in nine countries across Latin America by stealing data, installing malware and creating fake waves of enthusiasm and derision on social media. In an interview with Bloomberg Businessweek, the Colombian – who is currently serving a 10-year prison sentence – boasted of his ability to hack into campaign networks and manipulate opinion. "My job was to do actions of dirty war and psychological operations, black propaganda, rumours – the whole dark side of politics that nobody knows exists but everyone can see," the 31-year-old told Bloomberg. However, Sepúlveda's claims are fiercely contested by some of those he accuses.


Beto O'Rourke *checks notes* Instagrammed his dentist appointment

Mashable

Beto O'Rourke posted footage from his dentist appointment to his Instagram Stories on Thursday, including a truly too-close-up clip of him in the dentist's chair. Happening now on @BetoORourke's Insta story: "I'm here at the dentist, and we're going to continue our series about people who live along the border. My dental hygenist, Diana, is going to tell us about growing up in El Paso." pic.twitter.com/WsGZ9c9IBD Most of the Story, though, is an interview with Beto's dental hygienist, Diana, about growing up in El Paso near the U.S.-Mexico border. She tells a story about how her community banded together to help her mother, who is from Mexico, pass her citizenship test -- a testament to the strong border communities overlooked and mischaracterized by the GOP.


Hacker claims he helped Enrique Peña Nieto win Mexican presidential election

The Guardian

A digital dark arts campaign by mercenary hackers helped Enrique Peña Nieto win Mexico's 2012 presidential election, according to an imprisoned Colombian hacker who says he was involved. Andrés Sepúlveda, an online campaign strategist, claimed he had also helped to manipulate elections in nine countries across Latin America by stealing data, installing malware and creating fake waves of enthusiasm and derision on social media. In an interview with Bloomberg Businessweek, the Colombian – who is currently serving a 10-year prison sentence – boasted of his ability to hack into campaign networks and manipulate opinion. "My job was to do actions of dirty war and psychological operations, black propaganda, rumours – the whole dark side of politics that nobody knows exists but everyone can see," the 31-year-old told Bloomberg. Although he was well paid for his work, he said his primary motive was political.