Artificial Intelligence Only Goes So Far In Today's Economy, Says MIT Study

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Artificial intelligence and machine learning may be ideal for picking up the day-to-day tasks of running enterprises, but still fall flat when it comes to innovation or reacting to unforeseen or one-off events. While enterprise-grade AI is still a ways off, it's incumbent on business and IT leaders to start piloting and exploring the advantages AI potentially offers. That's the word coming out of a recent report from the MIT Task Force on the Work of the Future, which looked at AI as part of a broad range of changes sweeping the employment scene and workplace. "We are a long way from AI systems that can read the news, re-plan supply chains in response to anticipated events like Brexit or trade disputes, and adapt production tasks to new sources of parts and materials," state the report's authors, David Autor of the National Bureau of Economic Research, along with David Mindell and Elisabeth Reynolds, both with MIT. For starters, data – the fuel that propels AI decision-making – is not ready for the leap.


Artificial Intelligence Only Goes So Far In Today's Economy, Says MIT Study

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence and machine learning may be ideal for picking up the day-to-day tasks of running enterprises, but still fall flat when it comes to innovation or reacting to unforeseen or one-off events. While enterprise-grade AI is still a ways off, it's incumbent on business and IT leaders to start piloting and exploring the advantages AI potentially offers. That's the word coming out of a recent report from the MIT Task Force on the Work of the Future, which looked at AI as part of a broad range of changes sweeping the employment scene and workplace. "We are a long way from AI systems that can read the news, re-plan supply chains in response to anticipated events like Brexit or trade disputes, and adapt production tasks to new sources of parts and materials," state the report's authors, David Autor of the National Bureau of Economic Research, along with David Mindell and Elisabeth Reynolds, both with MIT. For starters, data – the fuel that propels AI decision-making – is not ready for the leap.


Artificial Intelligence Only Goes So Far In Today's Economy, Says MIT Study

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence and machine learning may be ideal for picking up the day-to-day tasks of running enterprises, but still fall flat when it comes to innovation or reacting to unforeseen or one-off events. While enterprise-grade AI is still a ways off, it's incumbent on business and IT leaders to start piloting and exploring the advantages AI potentially offers. That's the word coming out of a recent report from the MIT Task Force on the Work of the Future, which looked at AI as part of a broad range of changes sweeping the employment scene and workplace. "We are a long way from AI systems that can read the news, re-plan supply chains in response to anticipated events like Brexit or trade disputes, and adapt production tasks to new sources of parts and materials," state the report's authors, David Autor, Ford professor of economics at MIT, along with David Mindell, professor of the history of engineering and manufacturing at MIT, and Elisabeth Reynolds, principal research scientist at MIT. For starters, data – the fuel that propels AI decision-making – is not ready for the leap.


What The Future Of Work Means For Cities

NPR Technology

NOTE: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here. Two weeks ago, MIT's David Autor gave the prestigious Richard T. Ely lecture at the annual meeting of American economists in Atlanta. Introduced by the former chair of the Federal Reserve Ben Bernanke as a "first-class thinker" who was doing "path-breaking" work on the central economic issues of automation, globalization, and inequality, Autor strolled up to the microphone with a big smile. His talk was about the past and future of work, and he focused especially on cities.


Robots Are Poised to Make Life Grim for the Working Class

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The spread of computers and the internet will put jobs in two categories. People who tell computers what to do, and people who are told by computers what to do. Andreessen has since repudiated this declaration, and taken a more optimistic stance. But economists, a more pessimistic bunch, are taking the possibility of this sort of bifurcated future more seriously. As machine-learning technology enjoys rapid progress, more top researchers are investigating the question of what work will look like in a world filled with computers that can replicate or surpass many of humanity's own mental abilities.