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Nobel Prize in Chemistry is awarded to a trio that created the world's smallest machines

Daily Mail - Science & tech

This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded for work dating back to 1983, on the design of the smallest machines in the world. British-born Sir Fraser Stoddart, Frenchman Jean-Pierre Sauvage, and Dutch scientist Bernard'Ben' Feringa have split the prize three ways for their invention and development of molecular machines. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said molecular machines'will most likely be used in the development of things such as new materials, sensors and energy storage systems.' The winning paper was entitled'for the design and synthesis of molecular machines'. Molecular machines are tiny molecules, a thousand times thinner than a strand of hair, with controllable movements, which can perform a task when energy is added.


Nobel Prize in chemistry: Scientists building world's tiniest machines

Christian Science Monitor | Science

Three scientists won the Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for developing the world's smallest machines, work that could revolutionize computer technology and lead to a new type of battery. Frenchman Jean-Pierre Sauvage, British-born Fraser Stoddart and Dutch scientist Bernard "Ben" Feringa share the 8 million kronor ( 930,000) prize for the "design and synthesis of molecular machines," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said. Machines at the molecular level are 1,000th the width of a human hair and have taken chemistry to a new dimension, the academy said. Molecular machines "will most likely be used in the development of things such as new materials, sensors and energy storage systems." Stoddart has already developed a molecule-based computer chip with 20 kB memory.


The Nobel Prize in chemistry is awarded to three chemists for 'design and synthesis' of molecular machines

Los Angeles Times

Frenchman Jean-Pierre Sauvage, British-born Fraser Stoddart and Dutch scientist Bernard "Ben" Feringa on Wednesday won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing minuscule machines at the molecular level. The laureates share the 930,000 prize for the "design and synthesis" of molecular machines with controllable movements, which can perform a task when energy is added, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said. The academy said molecular machines "will most likely be used in the development of things such as new materials, sensors and energy storage systems." Sauvage, 71, is professor emeritus at the University of Strasbourg and director of research emeritus at France's National Center for Scientific Research. His wife, reached by telephone, was choking back tears.


2016 Nobel Prize In Chemistry Awarded To Trio Of Scientists Who Created World's Smallest Machine

International Business Times

Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir Fraser Stoddart and Bernard Feringa were awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize for Chemistry at a conference in Stockholm, Sweden for creating the world's smallest machines. The trio of European laureates, who each worked on a different component of the project, will split the 8 million Swedish kronor prize equally. The tiny machines are built on a molecular scale and are a thousand times thinner than a strand of hair, reports the BBC. According to the Nobel Committee, the scientists "have mastered motion control at the molecular scale." "The laureates have opened this entire field of molecular machinery," said Göran Hansson, secretary general of the Swedish Academy of Sciences, reports The Guardian.


Nobel prize in chemistry goes to inventors of world's smallest machines

ZDNet

The 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to three scientists for their contributions to creating the world's smallest machine, which is 1,000 times smaller than a single strand of human hair. While this molecular motor is still in the early stages of development, it could become the foundation for miniature technology such as new materials, sensors, energy storage systems, and robots. Google's next big step for AI: Getting robots to teach each other new skills Robots haven't reached human intelligence yet, but Google's researchers are showing how they're closing the gap. The concept of making machines on the nanoscale has been around since the 1950s, but it took decades of experiments for scientists to achieve the milestones that brought the idea into the real world. Throughout this time, researchers have been inspired by something called bacterial flagella, microscopic "engines" that are found in nature.