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google-purges-private-medical-records-search-results

Engadget

Very few things qualify for removal from Google's search results, and according to Bloomberg, that list just grew by one. The tech titan has apparently begun purging personal medical records from results pages -- Google didn't make a big announcement about it, but a new line on its Removal Policies website confirms the new rule. Under the section marked "Information we may remove," there's a new entry that says "confidential, personal medical records of private people." Google might have begun working on the category's addition after an unfortunate event in December that exposed the sensitive medical condition of a massive number of people.


Google begins removing private medical records from search results

The Guardian

Google has started removing private medical records from its search results, after adjusting its policy regarding personal information. The change was made on Thursday to include the "confidential, personal medical records of private people" in the bracket of information Google may remove unprompted from search results. Other examples of such information include national or government issued identification numbers, bank account numbers, credit card numbers and images of signatures. The leaking of private medical records can be extremely damaging to the victims, both financially and emotionally, with future prospects affected and private lives of the vulnerable exposed. Given that Google's indexing system will capture anything that's publicly accessible on the internet, leaks such as those created by an Indian pathology lab which uploaded more than 43,000 patient records in December, including names and HIV blood test results, can be particularly damaging.


Google and the University of Chicago Are Sued Over Data Sharing

#artificialintelligence

When the University of Chicago Medical Center announced a partnership to share patient data with Google in 2017, the alliance was promoted as a way to unlock information trapped in electronic health records and improve predictive analysis in medicine. On Wednesday, the University of Chicago, the medical center and Google were sued in a potential class-action lawsuit accusing the hospital of sharing hundreds of thousands of patients' records with the technology giant without stripping identifiable date stamps or doctor's notes. The suit, filed in United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, demonstrates the difficulties technology companies face in handling health data as they forge ahead into one of the most promising -- and potentially lucrative -- areas of artificial intelligence: diagnosing medical problems. Google is at the forefront of an effort to build technology that can read electronic health records and help physicians identify medical conditions. But the effort requires machines to learn this skill by analyzing a vast array of old health records collected by hospitals and other medical institutions.


Doctors are wearing the new Google Glass while seeing patients

Popular Science

You could be forgiven for assuming that Glass, Google's head-mounted augmented-reality device, had been effectively dead since 2015. But as Google's sister company X, the Moonshot Factory, announced on Tuesday, the project has been pivoting to a business-to-business model over the past two years. The new, updated version of the device is known as Glass Enterprise Edition, and it's been put to use at companies like Boeing, DHL--and in your physician's office. Going to the doctor today is "a pretty tragic experience," says Ian Shakil, the CEO and co-founder of a company called Augmedix. Its platform enables physicians to wear Glass Enterprise Edition as they see patients, while remote medical scribes fill out the electronic medical records based on what they hear and see from the visit.


WSJ News Exclusive

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Alphabet Inc.'s Google and national hospital chain HCA Healthcare Inc. have struck a deal to develop healthcare algorithms using patient records, the latest foray by a tech giant into the $3 trillion healthcare sector. HCA, which operates across about 2,000 locations in 21 states, would consolidate and store with Google data from digital health records and internet-connected medical devices under the multiyear agreement. Google and HCA engineers will work to develop algorithms to help improve operating efficiency, monitor patients and guide doctors' decisions, according to the companies. "Data are spun off of every patient in real time," said Dr. Jonathan Perlin, chief medical officer of HCA, which is based in Nashville, Tenn. "Part of what we're building is a central nervous system to help interpret the various signals."