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#NeurIPS2021 in tweets – highlights from the first week

AIHub

The first week of the 35th conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NeurIPS2021) saw eight fascinating invited talks, tutorials, affinity group workshops, and a new datasets and benchmarks track. There were also poster sessions, oral sessions, competitions, demonstrations, and more. With this compilation of tweets, we look back on the week. "The greatest violence is the product of remoteness from reality" – a great talk by Mary L. Gray, The Banality of Scale: A Theory on the Limits of Modeling Bias and Fairness Frameworks for Social Justice (and other lessons from the Pandemic) at #NeurIPS2021 'How duolingo uses AI to Asses, Engage and Teach Better' session @NeurIPSConf is . The final #NeurIPS2021 keynote starts soon! Radhika Nagpal will speak about "The Collective Intelligence of Army Ants, and the Robots They Inspire" at 15:00 GMT (10am EST).https://t.co/hSBUpuwUI8


#NeurIPS2021 in tweets – highlights from the first two days

AIHub

Consequences of Massive Scaling in Machine Learning opening panel #NeurIPS2021 agrees LLMs haven't yet shifted paradigm, but might do so when we find emergent intelligence *without* understanding.


AI Weekly: NeurIPS proves machine learning at scale is hard

#artificialintelligence

The world's largest AI research conference is underway in Vancouver, Canada. Researchers are presenting more than 1,400 papers at the Neural Information Processing Systems (NeurIPS) conference, ranging from work that organizers believe has had the greatest impact over the past decade to Yoshua Bengio's continued march toward consciousness for deep learning. But even as the conference showed theoretical research and neuroscience-related papers on the rise alongside categories like algorithms and deep learning, the mushrooming of the event itself -- and the associated growing pains -- was a constant theme, and it speaks to the growth of the AI field in general. Organizers said that at the start of the conference Sunday, they expected about 400 people to show up for registration. All told, NeurIPS 2019 welcomed 13,000 attendees, up 40% from the prior year.


The top AI and machine learning conferences to attend in 2020

#artificialintelligence

While artificial intelligence may be powering Siri, Google searches, and the advance of self-driving cars, many people still have sci-fi-inspired notions of what AI actually looks like and how it will affect our lives. AI-focused conferences give researchers and business executives a clear view of what is already working and what is coming down the road. To bring AI researchers from academia and industry together to share their work, learn from one another, and inspire new ideas and collaborations, there are a plethora of AI-focused conferences around the world. There's a growing number of AI conferences geared toward business leaders who want to learn how to use artificial intelligence and related machine learning and deep learning to propel their companies beyond their competitors. So, whether you're a post-doc, a professor working on robotics, or a programmer for a major company, there are conferences out there to help you code better, network with other researchers, and show off your latest papers.


Ideas for Improving the Field of Machine Learning: Summarizing Discussion from the NeurIPS 2019 Retrospectives Workshop

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This report documents ideas for improving the field of machine learning, which arose from discussions at the ML Retrospectives workshop at NeurIPS 2019. The goal of the report is to disseminate these ideas more broadly, and in turn encourage continuing discussion about how the field could improve along these axes. We focus on topics that were most discussed at the workshop: incentives for encouraging alternate forms of scholarship, restructuring the review process, participation from academia and industry, and how we might better train computer scientists as scientists. Videos from the workshop can be accessed at Lowe et al. (2019).