NICE acquires inContact for 940 million, eyes cloud-based call centers

ZDNet

Israeli tech firm NICE Systems announced it is acquiring inContact, makers of cloud-based software for call centers, for 940 million. NICE says the acquisition will help the company expand its customer service offerings and provide a platform for a fully integrated cloud contact center via a planned Contact Center as a Service (CCaaS) approach. After the deal closes, NICE and inContact plan to combine their contact center applications and analytics with cloud contact center technology, targeting both SMBs and enterprises. NICE traditionally has focused on analytics-based customer service tools for financial institutions and other large enterprises. "Together, inContact and NICE are ... combining our best-in-class contact center applications and analytics with cloud contact center," said NICE CEO Barak Eilam.


Fireside chat: The future of contact center AI with Genesys Cloud and Google Cloud Registration

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As VP of Product Marketing, Chris leads the global team responsible for defining and promoting software technologies is responsible for galvanizing development efforts to keep Genesys ahead of the technology curve in the areas of emerging AI, Sales and Marketing and Workforce Engagement Management. His in-depth customer experience knowledge has made him one of our most sought after strategic advisors.


Cloud Contact Center Call Center Industry News

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A major Houston-based energy company sold its San Antonio data center to a West Coast cloud computing giant in a deal that was filed during late October, one day after the company announced it signed up as a client for cloud services, public records show. Chevron USA Inc., a subsidiary of Chevron Corp., sold its 5200 Rogers Road data center to Microsoft Corp. on Oct. 31. It was appraised to be worth $80 million, according to the Bexar County Appraisal District. The value of the sale was not disclosed.


The Future of Multi-Cloud Computing @CloudExpo #AI #Analytics #Compliance

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What Is the Future of Multi-Cloud Computing? Like so many other IT solutions, cloud computing services have long been promoted from a standpoint of administrative efficiency. As the rationale goes, if you get your cloud services from a single provider, you'll enjoy the reduced hassle of consolidating third party business relationships, receive IT services at bargain prices, and have an easier time coordinating those services. It's true that using fewer service providers can offer some nice perks, but cloud computing is moving in the opposite direction at many companies. Instead of reaping the benefits of placing cloud services under one umbrella, businesses are mining the advantages of the antithetical approach: receiving cloud services from multiple providers - a discipline known as "multi-cloud computing."


Twilio launches Twilio Flex, aims for programmable, multichannel cloud call center

ZDNet

Cloud communications provider Twilio launched Twilio Flex a contact center platform that covers multiple channels and allows customers to customize interfaces, routing and reporting. Twilio Flex can scale up to 50,000 agents. The aim for Twilio is to do battle with existing call center infrastructure players that deploy on-premise call center hardware and software. Twilio is betting that Flex can bring more APIs to the call center and enable enterprises to customize more. The call center market features a bevy of players ranging from business process outsourcing companies to systems integrators to private branch exchange providers.