Artificial Intelligence may not take your job, but it could become your boss

#artificialintelligence

When Conor Sprouls, a customer service representative in the call center of insurance giant MetLife talks to a customer over the phone, he keeps one eye on the bottom-right corner of his screen. There, in a little blue box, A.I. tells him how he's doing. The program flashes an icon of a speedometer, indicating that he should slow down. A heart icon pops up. For decades, people have fearfully imagined armies of hyper-efficient robots invading offices and factories, gobbling up jobs once done by humans.


In some companies, artificial intelligence is replacing the boss

#artificialintelligence

When Conor Sprouls, a customer service representative in the call center of insurance giant MetLife talks to a customer over the phone, he keeps one eye on the bottom-right corner of his screen. There, in a little blue box, A.I. tells him how he's doing. The program flashes an icon of a speedometer, indicating that he should slow down. A heart icon pops up. For decades, people have fearfully imagined armies of hyper-efficient robots invading offices and factories, gobbling up jobs once done by humans.


This AI Software Is 'Coaching' Customer Service Workers. Soon It Could Be Bossing You Around, Too

TIME - Tech

I'm on the phone with a startup executive roleplaying as a frustrated customer, and a note along with a speedometer icon appears on my computer screen: Speaking slowly -- You are speaking slower than usual. Try increasing your speaking pace. I speed up, and the message disappears, only to be replaced with another: Continuous Speaking -- Finish your thought. Later, as the exec struggles to find the date of a made-up transaction, the software I'm using detects the strained note in his voice, and again decides I should intervene. A new message appears, this one accompanied by a pink heart: Empathy Cue -- Think about how the customer is feeling.


AI training human employees to have more empathy at work

#artificialintelligence

"You are speaking faster than usual," reads an alert on a computer screen. The call center agent on the phone with a customer can see a speedometer icon. The conversation with the customer continues, as does the computer feedback. "Think about how the customer is feeling. Try to relate," the artificial intelligence-powered tool interjects.


Call Centers Tap Voice-Analysis Software to Monitor Moods

WIRED

We all know how it feels to be low on energy at the end of a long work day. Some call-center agents at insurer MetLife are watched over by software that knows how it sounds. A program called Cogito presents a cheery notification when the toll of hours discussing maternity or bereavement benefits show in a worker's voice. "It's represented by a cute little coffee cup," says Emily Baker, who supervises a group fielding calls about disability claims at MetLife. Her team reports that the cartoon cup is a helpful nudge to sit up straight and speak like the engaged helper MetLife wants them to be.