Artificial Intelligence may not take your job, but it could become your boss

#artificialintelligence

When Conor Sprouls, a customer service representative in the call center of insurance giant MetLife talks to a customer over the phone, he keeps one eye on the bottom-right corner of his screen. There, in a little blue box, A.I. tells him how he's doing. The program flashes an icon of a speedometer, indicating that he should slow down. A heart icon pops up. For decades, people have fearfully imagined armies of hyper-efficient robots invading offices and factories, gobbling up jobs once done by humans.


In some companies, artificial intelligence is replacing the boss

#artificialintelligence

When Conor Sprouls, a customer service representative in the call center of insurance giant MetLife talks to a customer over the phone, he keeps one eye on the bottom-right corner of his screen. There, in a little blue box, A.I. tells him how he's doing. The program flashes an icon of a speedometer, indicating that he should slow down. A heart icon pops up. For decades, people have fearfully imagined armies of hyper-efficient robots invading offices and factories, gobbling up jobs once done by humans.


This AI Software Is 'Coaching' Customer Service Workers. Soon It Could Be Bossing You Around, Too

TIME - Tech

I'm on the phone with a startup executive roleplaying as a frustrated customer, and a note along with a speedometer icon appears on my computer screen: Speaking slowly -- You are speaking slower than usual. Try increasing your speaking pace. I speed up, and the message disappears, only to be replaced with another: Continuous Speaking -- Finish your thought. Later, as the exec struggles to find the date of a made-up transaction, the software I'm using detects the strained note in his voice, and again decides I should intervene. A new message appears, this one accompanied by a pink heart: Empathy Cue -- Think about how the customer is feeling.


Call Centers Tap Voice-Analysis Software to Monitor Moods

WIRED

We all know how it feels to be low on energy at the end of a long work day. Some call-center agents at insurer MetLife are watched over by software that knows how it sounds. A program called Cogito presents a cheery notification when the toll of hours discussing maternity or bereavement benefits show in a worker's voice. "It's represented by a cute little coffee cup," says Emily Baker, who supervises a group fielding calls about disability claims at MetLife. Her team reports that the cartoon cup is a helpful nudge to sit up straight and speak like the engaged helper MetLife wants them to be.


Robots will be your colleagues not your...

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Fears that robots will eliminate your job are unfounded with a growing number of employers planning to increase or maintain headcount as a result of automation, staffing company ManpowerGroup said in a survey published on Friday. The'Humans Wanted: Robots Need You' report surveyed 19,000 employers in 44 countries and found 69 percent of firms were planning to maintain the size of their workforce while 18 percent wanted to hire more people as a result of automation. That was the highest result in three years. Just 9 percent of employers in the annual survey said automation would directly lead to job losses, while 4 percent did not know what the impact would be. The report went on to say that 24 percent of the firms that will invest in automation and digital technologies over the next two years plan to add jobs compared to 18 percent of those who are not automating.