Book: A Guide to Data Science for Fraud Detection

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Fraud Analytics Using Descriptive, Predictive, and Social Network Techniques is an authoritative guidebook for setting up a comprehensive fraud detection analytics solution. Early detection is a key factor in mitigating fraud damage, but it involves more specialized techniques than detecting fraud at the more advanced stages. This invaluable guide details both the theory and technical aspects of these techniques, and provides expert insight into streamlining implementation. Coverage includes data gathering, preprocessing, model building, and post-implementation, with comprehensive guidance on various learning techniques and the data types utilized by each. These techniques are effective for fraud detection across industry boundaries, including applications in insurance fraud, credit card fraud, anti-money laundering, healthcare fraud, telecommunications fraud, click fraud, tax evasion, and more, giving you a highly practical framework for fraud prevention.


E-learning courses on Advanced Analytics, Credit Risk Modeling, and Fraud Analytics

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The E-learning course starts by refreshing the basic concepts of the analytics process model: data preprocessing, analytics and post processing. We then discuss decision trees and ensemble methods (bagging, boosting, random forests), neural networks, support vector machines (SVMs), Bayesian networks, survival analysis, social networks, monitoring and backtesting analytical models. Throughout the course, we extensively refer to our industry and research experience. The E-learning course consists of more than 20 hours of movies, each 5 minutes on average. Quizzes are included to facilitate the understanding of the material.


Big Data Analytics with SAS

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The Fourth Industrial Revolution is upon us, even with the Third is still in progress. Big Data, Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence are three of the driving forces behind it. While the term'Industrial Revolution' has always applied mainly to manufacturing, it now also involves service industries such as banking and insurance, who are investing heavily in Big Data to help them model credit risk, fraud, marketing success and other key data. Meanwhile manufacturing, retail, telco, pharma and many other sectors constantly need people skilled in building, analysing, monitoring and maintaining data models to gain strategic intelligence that helps them inform and adapt their key business processes. A leader in the world of Data Analytics is the SAS Institute, whose flagship product is SAS (Statistical Analysis System).


Cross-channel fraud detection

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Cyber fraud costs organizations billions of dollars each year, and its financial impact continues to climb as criminals are getting smarter and their attacks more complex. While the increasing need for rapid and complex fraud risk detection is common in many sectors, it is perhaps most acute among financial institutions and online merchants. Competition is fierce in these highly digitized markets, and margins are razor-thin. Customers are extremely demanding, and constantly seek better, more user-friendly payment options and channels. Cross-channel fraud detection has been an area of focus for both business and security leaders for nearly a decade.


An Economic Perspective on Fraud Analytics: Calculating ROI of Fraud Detection Systems

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Even though these numbers are rough estimates rather than exact measurements, they are based on evidence and do indicate the importance and impact of the phenomenon, and therefore as well the need for organizations and governments to actively fight and prevent fraud with all means they have at their disposal. These numbers indicate that it is likely worthwhile to invest in fraud detection and prevention systems, since a significant financial return on investment can be made. However, estimating the return on investment in analytical approaches to fighting fraud is not self-evident, requiring an assessment of the total cost of ownership of analytical models as well as the full impact of fraud on the organization and the total utility of fraud detection and investigation. The Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) of a fraud analytical model refers to the cost of owning and operating the analytical model over its expected lifetime, from inception to retirement. It should consider both quantitative and qualitative costs and is a key input to make strategic decisions about how to optimally invest in fraud analytics.