Iran reportedly deploys Russian-made S-300 missiles at its Fordow nuclear site

The Japan Times

ANKARA – Iran has deployed the Russian-supplied S-300 surface-to-air missile defense system around its Fordow underground uranium enrichment facility, Iranian state media reported Monday. Iranian state TV on Sunday aired footage of deployment of the recently delivered missile system to the nuclear site in the central Iran. "Our main priority is to protect Iran's nuclear facilities under any circumstances," Brig. Gen. Farzad Esmaili, commander of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps' (IRGC) air defense force told state TV. Iran and the six major powers reached a landmark nuclear deal in 2015 aimed at curbing Iran's nuclear program in exchange for lifting nuclear-related sanctions imposed on Tehran over its disputed nuclear work.


Iran warns enduring sanctions threatening nuclear deal

Al Jazeera

The head of Iran's atomic energy agency has warned his country's landmark nuclear deal with five world powers could be jeopardised by foot-dragging on a pledge of sanctions relief in exchange for Tehran's commitment to curb atomic activities. Ali Akbar Salehi said on Monday that "comprehensive and expeditious removal of all sanctions" outlined in the agreement "have yet to be met," even though his country is honouring all its obligations under the historic pact. But other Iranian officials have faulted the United States for delays in lifting financial sanctions. Salehi said the deal's "durability" depended on the other side's "reciprocal and full implementation". Iran complains that international financial sanctions are not being lifted quickly enough under the agreement that stipulates a removal of these and other penalties imposed over Tehran's nuclear programme, in exchange for its agreement to curb atomic pursuits that could be used to make a bomb.


Group that promoted Iran nuclear deal also funded media reports

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – A group that the White House recently identified as a key surrogate in promoting the Iran nuclear deal gave National Public Radio 100,000 last year to help it report on the pact and related issues, according to the group's annual report. It also funded reporters and partnerships with other news outlets. The Ploughshares Fund's mission is to "build a safe, secure world by developing and investing in initiatives to reduce and ultimately eliminate the world's nuclear stockpiles," one that dovetails with President Barack Obama's arms control efforts. But its behind-the-scenes role advocating for the Iran agreement got more attention this month following a candid profile of Ben Rhodes, one of the president's top foreign policy aides, in The New York Times Magazine. In the article, Rhodes explained how the administration worked with nongovernmental organizations, proliferation experts and reporters to build support for the seven-nation accord, which curtailed Iran's nuclear activity and softened international financial penalties on Tehran.


Iran Nuclear Deal Under Trump: Rouhani Says Accord Cannot Be Reversed By Republican President-Elect

International Business Times

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani said Wednesday that the U.S. election results would not affect Tehran's policies and that there was "no possibility" of its nuclear deal being overturned by President-elect Donald Trump, despite the latter's position on the issue, state news agency IRNA reported. "Iran's understanding in the nuclear deal was that the accord was not concluded with one country or government but was approved by a resolution of the UN Security Council and there is no possibility that it can be changed by a single government," Rouhani addressed his cabinet, according to state television. Last year, six world powers signed an accord lifting international sanctions on Iran in exchange for guarantees that the country would not pursue a nuclear weapons capability. This move had been repeatedly termed "disastrous" by Trump during his election campaign, who had maintained that it would be his "number one priority" to dismantle the agreement if he became the president. Even as a moderate who has attempted to forge ties with the West, Rouhani said the U.S. was losing its standing in the world because of its "wrong policies."


In a first since the Iran nuclear deal, Tehran will invite foreign firms to bid on oil and gas projects

Los Angeles Times

Iran will invite foreign companies to bid for oil and gas projects for the first time since last year's landmark nuclear deal with world powers, the country's Ministry of Petroleum said Sunday. The ministry did not say how many projects would be involved but said they include exploration and production in oil and gas fields, with the bidding process opening on Monday. It will be the first time Iran offers an international tender for oil and gas projects since the nuclear deal went into effect in January. The ministry's website said foreign companies should submit their applications by Nov. 19 and that successful companies would be announced on Dec. 7. Iran had previously said that priority for exploration and production for foreign companies would be given to neighboring countries with which it shares border fields.