Artificial Intelligence Can Help Doctors Better Detect Heart Attacks

#artificialintelligence

Caption: Paramedics respond to an emergency. Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence tool that lets doctors determine whether someone is having a heart attack much faster than current methods. New research published by healthcare firm Abbott shows that its algorithm could enable hospital accident and emergency departments to more accurately identify and treat patients having a cardiac arrest. The study, which involved researchers from the U.S., Germany, U.K., Switzerland, Australia and New Zealand and more than 11,000 patients, found that AI could provide doctors a more comprehensive analysis of the probability that a patient was having a heart attack. Agim Beshiri, a senior medical director at Abbott, said: "AI technology has the capability to consider many variables, characteristics and data points and combine them in seconds into meaningful results. "Because of today's advancements in computational power and AI applications, healthcare stands to benefit greatly by this approach where clinicians have to do this with their patients every day." Developed by a team of physicians and statisticians at Abbott, the algorithm uses machine learning techniques to enable a more individualized calculation of a person's heart attack risk. The technology aims to improve and quicken heart attack diagnosis by analyzing extensive datasets and identifying factors such as age, sex and a person's specific troponin levels (a cardiac biomarker). Abbott said the algorithm is designed to help address two barriers that exist today for doctors looking for more individualized information when diagnosing heart attacks. The first is that international guidelines for using highly sensitive troponin tests don't always account for personal factors, impacting test results. And the second is that while these guidelines recommend that doctors carry out troponin testing at fixed times, they don't consider a person's age or sex and put patients into a one-size-fits-all situation. However, Abbott's algorithm differs from existing approaches as it takes into consideration personal factors and troponin blood test results over time. Beshiri added: "The World Heart Organization estimates that 17.9 million people die from cardiovascular disease each year, and 85% are due to heart attacks and strokes.


Artificial Intelligence Can Help Doctors Better Detect Heart Attacks

#artificialintelligence

Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence tool that lets doctors determine whether someone is having a heart attack much quicker than current methods. New research published by healthcare firm Abbott shows that its algorithm could enable hospital accident and emergency departments to more accurately identify and treat patients having a cardiac arrest. The study, which involved researchers from the U.S., Germany, U.K., Switzerland, Australia and New Zealand and more than 11,000 patients, found that AI could provide doctors a more comprehensive analysis of the probability that a patient was having a heart attack. Agim Beshiri, a senior medical director at Abbott, said: "AI technology has the capability to consider many variables, characteristics and data points and combine them in seconds into meaningful results. "Because of today's advancements in computational power and AI applications, healthcare stands to benefit greatly by this approach where clinicians have to do this with their patients every day." Developed by a team of physicians and statisticians at Abbott, the algorithm uses machine learning techniques to enable a more individualized calculation of a person's heart attack risk. The technology aims to improve and quicken heart attack diagnosis by analyzing extensive datasets and identifying factors such as age, sex and a person's specific troponin levels (a cardiac biomarker). Abbott said the algorithm is designed to help address two barriers that exist today for doctors looking for more individualized information when diagnosing heart attacks. The first is that international guidelines for using high sensitive troponin tests don't always account for personal factors, impacting test results. And the second is that while these guidelines recommend that doctors carry out troponin testing at fixed times, they don't consider a person's age or sex and put patients into a one-size-fits-all situation. However, Abbott's algorithm differs from existing approaches as it takes into consideration personal factors and troponin blood test results over time Beshiri added: "The World Heart Organization estimates that 17.9 million people die from cardiovascular disease each year, and 85% are due to heart attacks and strokes.


New Data Shows Artificial Intelligence Technology Can Help Doctors Better Determine Which Patients are Having a Heart Attack

#artificialintelligence

ABBOTT PARK, Ill., Sept. 12, 2019 -- Abbott announced that new research, published in the journal Circulation, found its algorithm could help doctors in hospital emergency rooms more accurately determine if someone is having a heart attack or not, so that they can receive faster treatments or be safely discharged.1 In this study, researchers from the U.S., Germany, U.K., Switzerland, Australia and New Zealand looked at more than 11,000 patients to determine if Abbott's technology developed using artificial intelligence (AI) could provide a faster, more accurate determination that someone is having a heart attack or not. The study found that the algorithm provided doctors a more comprehensive analysis of the probability that a patient was having a heart attack or not, particularly for those who entered the hospital within the first three hours of when their symptoms started. "With machine learning technology, you can go from a one-size-fits-all approach for diagnosing heart attacks to an individualized and more precise risk assessment that looks at how all the variables interact at that moment in time," said Fred Apple, Ph.D., Hennepin HealthCare/ Hennepin County Medical Center, professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at the University of Minnesota, and one of the study authors. "This could give doctors in the ER more personalized, timely and accurate information to determine if their patient is having a heart attack or not." A team of physicians and statisticians at Abbott developed the algorithm* using AI tools to analyze extensive data sets and identify the variables most predictive for determining a cardiac event, such as age, sex and a person's specific troponin levels (using a high sensitivity troponin-I blood test**) and blood sample timing.


'Instant' blood test for heart attacks

BBC News

A blood test that could rule out a heart attack in under 20 minutes should be used routinely, say UK researchers. A team from King's College London have tested it on patients and say the cMyC test could be rolled out on the NHS within five years. They claim it would save the health service millions of pounds each year by freeing up beds and sending well patients home. About two-thirds of patients with chest pain will not have had a heart attack. A heart trace, called an ECG, can quickly show up major heart attacks, but it is not very good at excluding more common, smaller ones that can still be life-threatening.


Artificial Intelligence Can Help Doctors Better Detect Heart Attacks

#artificialintelligence

Caption: Paramedics respond to an emergency. Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence tool that lets doctors determine whether someone is having a heart attack much faster than current methods. New research published by healthcare firm Abbott shows that its algorithm could enable hospital accident and emergency departments to more accurately identify and treat patients having a cardiac arrest. The study, which involved researchers from the U.S., Germany, U.K., Switzerland, Australia and New Zealand and more than 11,000 patients, found that AI could provide doctors a more comprehensive analysis of the probability that a patient was having a heart attack. Agim Beshiri, a senior medical director at Abbott, said: "AI technology has the capability to consider many variables, characteristics and data points and combine them in seconds into meaningful results.