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Oracle needs multi-cloud strategy, wider datacentre footprint in APAC

ZDNet

SAN FRANCISCO--Oracle needs to expand its datacentre footprint in Asia-Pacific and outline a clear multi-cloud strategy, especially as the majority of enterprises in the region are expected to deploy across different cloud environments. Driven by the architectures on which applications run on, businesses would end up running cloud platforms from different vendors, according to Chris Morris, IDC's vice president of cloud services and technology group for Asia-Pacific excluding Japan. For instance, a suitable analytics engine might be available on one cloud environment, while another enterprise software would be optimised on a different cloud platform. Moreover, not all applications were available in every region, forcing companies to opt for different cloud vendors to access the best software for their business needs. This sourcing decision meant organisations often had to deal with managing a multi-cloud environment, said Morris, pointing to an IDC study that revealed more than 70 percent of Asia-Pacific enterprises would have a multi-cloud strategy by 2018.


Top cloud providers in 2020: AWS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud, hybrid, SaaS players

ZDNet

An introduction to cloud computing from IaaS and PaaS to hybrid, public and private cloud. Cloud computing in 2020 is more mature, going multi-cloud, and likely to become more focused on vertical and a sales ground war as the leading vendors battle for market share. Picking the top cloud services provider isn't easy given that the answer -- much like enterprise software and IT in general -- boils down to "it depends." Whether it's Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud platform in infrastructure as a service, or IBM, Dell Technologies, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise, and VMware in multi-cloud hybrid deployments, there are multiple variables for each enterprise. That said, a few key trends are emerging for cloud computing in 2020 that have shifted from 2019, 2018, and 2017. With that backdrop, let's get to the 2020 top cloud computing vendors. Disclosure: ZDNet may earn a commission from some of the products featured on this page. ZDNet and the author were not compensated for this independent review. AWS was the early leader in public cloud computing and has become a major player in AI, database, machine learning and serverless deployments. AWS was the first cloud computing and offering infrastructure as a service in 2008 and has never looked back as it launches new services at a breakneck pace and is creating its own compute stack that aims to be more efficient and pass those savings along. AWS has expanded well beyond cloud compute and storage. If processors based on Arm become the norm in the data center, the industry can thank the gravitational pull of AWS, which launched a second-generation Graviton processor and instances based on it. If successful, the Graviton and the Nitro abstraction layer can be the differentiator for AWS in the cloud wars.


Top cloud providers in 2021: AWS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud, hybrid, SaaS players

ZDNet

Here's a look at managing multiple cloud providers, how to play them off each other and what vendors and tools can help you manage multiple clouds. Cloud computing in 2021 has become the go-to model for information technology as companies prioritize as-a-service providers over traditional vendors, accelerate digital transformation projects, and enable the new normal of work following the COVID-19 pandemic. And while enterprises are deploying more multicloud arrangements the IT budgets are increasingly going to cloud giants. According to a recent survey from Flexera on IT budgets for 2021, money is flowing toward Microsoft Azure and its software-as-service offerings as well as Amazon Web Services. Google Cloud Platform is also garnering interest for big data and analytics workloads. But hybrid cloud and traditional data center vendors such as IBM, Dell Technologies, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise, and VMware have a role too. Meanwhile, Salesforce, ServiceNow, Adobe, and Workday are battling SAP and Oracle for more wallet and corporate data share. Salesforce and ServiceNow launched successful back-to-work enablement suites and cemented positions as major platforms. With that backdrop, let's get to the 2020 top cloud computing vendors. AWS was the early leader in public cloud computing and has become a major player in AI, database, machine learning and serverless deployments. AWS was the first to offer cloud computing infrastructure as a service in 2008 and has never looked back. It's launching new services at a breakneck pace and is creating its own compute stack that aims to be more efficient and pass those savings along.


Top cloud providers 2019: AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud; IBM makes hybrid move; Salesforce dominates SaaS

ZDNet

Cloud computing is insatiably gobbling up more of the backend services that power businesses. But, some companies have apps with privacy, security, and regulatory demands that preclude the cloud. Here's how to find the right mix of public cloud and private cloud. The top cloud providers for 2019 have maintained their positions, but the themes, strategies, and approaches to the market are all in flux. The infrastructure-as-a-service wars have been largely decided, with the spoils going to Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform, but new technologies such as artificial intelligence and machine learning have opened the field up to other players. Meanwhile, the cloud computing market in 2019 will have a decidedly multi-cloud spin, as the hybrid shift by players such as IBM, which is acquiring Red Hat, could change the landscape. This year's edition of the top cloud computing providers also features software-as-a-service giants that will increasingly run more of your enterprise's operations via expansion. One thing to note about the cloud in 2019 is that the market isn't zero sum. Cloud computing is driving IT spending overall. For instance, Gartner predicts that 2019 global IT spending will increase 3.2 percent to $3.76 trillion with as-a-service models fueling everything from data center spending to enterprise software.


Who's Winning the Cloud Database War

#artificialintelligence

Three-quarters of all databases will be deployed or migrated to the cloud within two years, Gartner said today in its much-anticipated report on cloud database management systems. The big cloud companies are winning their share of battles, but there's plenty of market share available for smaller and nimbler database providers too. Gartner turned heads in June 2019 when it declared that the cloud had become the default deployment mechanism for databases. "The message in our research is simple–on-premises is the new legacy," wrote Gartner analysts Adam Ronthal, Merv Adrian, and Donald Feinberg. Fast-forward 17 months, through the start of the COVID-19 pandemic and the ensuring lock-down on in-person work, and shift to the cloud has accelerated. Now those Gartner analysts (in addition to Rick Greenwald and Henry Cook) have teamed up for a reprisal of that 2019 report.