Huawei and UC Berkeley Announce Strategic Partnership into Basic AI Research - huawei press center

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Huawei will provide a US 1 million fund to UC Berkeley for research into many subjects of interest in AI, including deep learning, reinforcement learning, machine learning, natural language processing and computer vision. Through close cooperation, the Research and Development (R&D) teams of Huawei and the Berkeley Artificial Intelligence Research (BAIR) Lab will strive to make significant breakthroughs in AI theories and key technologies. The two parties believe that this strategic partnership will fuel the advancement of AI technology and create completely new experiences for people, thus contributing greatly to society at large. As one of the world's leading higher education institutes, UC Berkeley has profound expertise in machine learning and other AI domains. Its newly founded BAIR Lab brings together UC Berkeley researchers across the areas of computer vision, machine learning, natural language processing, robotics, and research planning.


Advancement of AI Opens Health Data Privacy to Attack

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Advances in artificial intelligence have created new threats to the privacy of health data, according to a new study by University of California, Berkeley researchers. University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) researchers have found that artificial intelligence (AI) innovations have created new threats to health data privacy against which current laws and regulations cannot adequately safeguard. The researchers demonstrated that AI can be used to identify individuals by learning daily patterns in step data--like that collected by activity trackers, smartwatches, and smartphones--and correlating it to demographic data. Said UC Berkeley's Anil Aswani, "In principle, you could imagine Facebook gathering step data from the app on your smartphone, then buying healthcare data from another company and matching the two. Now they would have healthcare data that's matched to names, and they could either start selling advertising based on that or they could sell the data to others."


Applying Machine Learning to the Universe's Mysteries

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Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and international collaborators have demonstrated computers' readiness to solve the universe's mysteries. The team used thousands of images from simulated high-energy particle collisions to train neural networks to identify important features. They found the networks were up to 95-percent successful in recognizing important features in a sampling of about 18,000 images. The researchers say machine-learning algorithms enable the networks to improve their analysis as they process more images, with the underlying technology employed in facial recognition and other types of image-based object recognition applications. "With this type of machine learning, we are trying to identify a certain pattern or correlation of patterns that is a unique signature of the equation of state," says Long-Gang Pan of the University of California, Berkeley.


San Francisco Artificial Intelligence Meetup

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Summer is welcoming us with great news! We are thrilled to announce Baidu Research as part of our AI Meetup series! We will start off with a Q&A with Andrew Ng, Chief Scientist at Baidu and one of the founding fathers of modern AI research. After that, we will follow with presentations from two researchers from Baidu's Silicon Valley AI Lab – Bryan Catanzaro and Eric Battenberg. Baidu Research brings together top researchers, scientists and engineers from around the world to work on fundamental AI research.


Artificial intelligence helps track down mysterious cosmic radio bursts

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Artificial intelligence is invading many fields, most recently astronomy and the search for intelligent life in the universe, or SETI. Researchers at Breakthrough Listen, a SETI project led by the University of California, Berkeley, have now used machine learning to discover 72 new fast radio bursts from a mysterious source some 3 billion light years from Earth. Fast radio bursts are bright pulses of radio emission mere milliseconds in duration, thought to originate from distant galaxies. The source of these emissions is still unclear, however. Theories range from highly magnetized neutron stars blasted by gas streams from a nearby supermassive black hole, to suggestions that the burst properties are consistent with signatures of technology developed by an advanced civilization.