FBI bosses grilled on secret face recognition program

Daily Mail

FBI bosses have been grilled over a secret facial recognition program that allows agents to access photos of tens of millions of Americans. The agency came under fire for its unrestricted access to ID photos in 18 states to help identify potential suspects - including innocent people who have never been charged with a crime. Privacy advocates suggested the technology fosters racial bias and compared the system to'Nazi Germany', at a congressional hearing yesterday. The system allows agents to access and algorithmically match the photos of tens of millions of Americans. More than 400million pictures of Americans' faces are kept in local, state and federal law enforcement facial recognition systems, the Government Accountability Office reported last year.


Recognize Anything: How Big Data Enables Photo Recognition

@machinelearnbot

When you upload photos to Facebook, have you noticed that the website already seems to know who's in them? It's remarkable, and you can give the credit to big data. Face recognition software, like fraud detection and ad matching algorithms, draws on deep libraries of content in order to deliver the correct results. And these data collections are hard at work across the web and in many of your favorite apps.


Recognize Anything: How Big Data Enables Photo Recognition

@machinelearnbot

When you upload photos to Facebook, have you noticed that the website already seems to know who's in them? It's remarkable, and you can give the credit to big data. Face recognition software, like fraud detection and ad matching algorithms, draws on deep libraries of content in order to deliver the correct results. And these data collections are hard at work across the web and in many of your favorite apps. It comes as no surprise that developers have been hard at work on face recognition software since it's an integral part of security programs.


Orlando ends Amazon facial recognition program over privacy concerns

Daily Mail

Florida has stopped testing Amazon's facial recognition program after rights groups raised concerns that the service could be used in ways that could violate civil liberties. Orlando ended a pilot program last week after its contract with Amazon.com Inc to use its Rekognition service expired. 'Partnering with innovative companies to test new technology - while also ensuring we uphold privacy laws and in no way violate the rights of others - is critical to us as we work to further keep our community safe,' the city and the Orlando Police Department said in a joint statement Monday. Orlando was one of several U.S. jurisdictions that Amazon has pitched its service to since unveiling it in late 2016 as a way to detect offensive content and secure public safety.