Text Mining Support in Semantic Annotation and Indexing of Multimedia Data

AAAI Conferences

This short paper is describing a demonstrator that is complementing the paper "Towards Cross-Media Feature Extraction" in these proceedings. The demo is exemplifying the use of textual resources, out of which semantic information can be extracted, for supporting the semantic annotation and indexing of associated video material in the soccer domain. Entities and events extracted from textual data are marked-up with semantic classes derived from an ontology modeling the soccer domain. We show further how extracted Audio-Video features by video analysis can be taken into account for additional annotation of specific soccer event types, and how those different types of annotation can be combined.


Eliciting Categorical Data for Optimal Aggregation

Neural Information Processing Systems

Models for collecting and aggregating categorical data on crowdsourcing platforms typically fall into two broad categories: those assuming agents honest and consistent but with heterogeneous error rates, and those assuming agents strategic and seek to maximize their expected reward. The former often leads to tractable aggregation of elicited data, while the latter usually focuses on optimal elicitation and does not consider aggregation. In this paper, we develop a Bayesian model, wherein agents have differing quality of information, but also respond to incentives. Our model generalizes both categories and enables the joint exploration of optimal elicitation and aggregation. This model enables our exploration, both analytically and experimentally, of optimal aggregation of categorical data and optimal multiple-choice interface design.


Google Assistant can order around LG's connected appliances

Engadget

LG has placed its trust on Google Assistant and has given it the power to control its smart appliances. While it teamed up with Amazon earlier this year to give its refrigerators built-in access to Alexa, its partnership with Google is much bigger in scale. Now, you can control any of the company's 87 WiFi-connected smart home appliances by barking out orders through a Google Home speaker or through a compatible iOS or Android smartphone. Once you're done setting voice control up through LG's SmartThinQ app, you can use commands within a Home speaker's range or through a phone to tell your fridge to make more ice or to tell your AC to adjust the temperature. If you have an LG washing machine, you can ask Assistant how much time is still left before your load is done.


Framework and Schema for Semantic Web Knowledge Bases

AAAI Conferences

There is a growing need for scalable semantic web repositories which support inference and provide efficient queries. There is also a growing interest in representing uncertain knowledge in semantic web datasets and ontologies. In this paper, I present a bit vector schema specifically designed for RDF (Resource Description Framework) datasets. I propose a system for materializing and storing inferred knowledge using this schema. I show experimental results that demonstrate that this solution simplifies inference queries and drastically improves results. I also propose and describe a solution for materializing and persisting uncertain information and probabilities. Thresholds and bit vectors are used to provide efficient query access to this uncertain knowledge. My goal is to provide a semantic web repository that supports knowledge inference, uncertainty reasoning, and Bayesian networks, without sacrificing performance or scalability.


Predicting Appropriate Semantic Web Terms from Words

AAAI Conferences

The Semantic Web language RDF was designed to unambiguously define and use ontologies to encode data and knowledge on the Web. Many people find it difficult, however, to write complex RDF statements and queries because doing so requires familiarity with the appropriate ontologies and the terms they define. We describe a system that suggests appropriate RDF terms given semantically related English words and general domain and context information. We use the Swoogle Semantic Web search engine to provide RDF term and namespace statistics, the WorldNet lexical ontology to find semantically related words, and a naïve Bayes classifier to suggest terms. A customized graph data structure of related namespaces is constructed from Swoogle's database to speed up the classifier model learning and prediction time.