Goto

Collaborating Authors

Artificial intelligence begins diagnosing patients in Eastern Iowa

#artificialintelligence

Federal cuts limit Iowa's access to health insurance enrollment services CORALVILLE -- The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics has become the first to employ new technology -- developed by a company rooted in the university's research engine -- that uses artificial intelligence to diagnose an eye disease. On June 12, the Diabetes and Endocrinology Center at UI Health Care-Iowa River Landing in Coralville began using technology developed by IDx, the Coralville-based medical diagnostics company. The device, which received approval from U.S. Food and Drug Administration in April, was developed to diagnose diabetic retinopathy, a diabetes complication that can cause blindness. Called IDx-DR, the device uses software and a retinal camera to take images of a patient's retina. From there, the AI analyzes the patient's images "the same way I do as a clinician" to determine if the patient has the condition, said Dr. Michael Abramoff, president and director of IDx and UI Health Care ophthalmologist.


Could artificial intelligence replace doctors? AI is now diagnosing this common eye disease

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is now being used to diagnose a common eye disease. The device, called IDx-DR, uses software and a retinal camera to take images of a patient's retina. It then uses an artificial intelligence algorithm to evaluate the images and effectively diagnose diabetic retinopathy, a diabetes complication that can lead to blindness. Developers hope this new device will make it easier for patients to get diagnosed outside of a clinical environment, leading perhaps to catching the condition earlier. The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics became the first to use the new technology in June, according to reports from The Gazette newspaper.


Artificial Intelligence Is Now Diagnosing Disease

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is now being used to diagnose a common eye disease. The device, called IDx-DR, uses software and a retinal camera to take images of a patient's retina. It then uses an artificial intelligence algorithm to evaluate the images and effectively diagnose diabetic retinopathy, a diabetes complication that can lead to blindness. Developers hope this new device will make it easier for patients to get diagnosed outside of a clinical environment, leading perhaps to catching the condition earlier. The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics became the first to use the new technology in June, according to reports from The Gazette newspaper.


This AI screening tool for diabetic retinopathy makes a decision, not a recommendation - MedCity News

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is a healthcare and technology buzzword right now, but IDx Founder and President Michael AbrĂ moff is not a Johnny-come-lately to this phenomenon. His journey and that of the company's lead product began over two decades ago in the Netherlands.


AI Tool Detects Diabetes-Related Eye Condition Without Human Interpretation - AI Trends

#artificialintelligence

Last year, IDx-DR became the first-ever so-called "autonomous AI" system cleared by the FDA to provide a screening decision without the oversight of a doctor. Since then, IDx Technologies, the company behind the product, has begun to roll out this tool designed to detect diabetic retinopathy. Over 30 million people are living with diabetes in the US alone. "The disease itself is bad," said Michael Abramoff, a University of Iowa ophthalmologist and computer scientist, "but the complications make it even worse." One of those complications is diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness in American adults.