Amazon Says It Can Detect Fear on Your Face. You Scared?

#artificialintelligence

Amazon announced a breakthrough from its AI experts Monday: Their algorithms can now read fear on your face, at a cost of $0.001 per image--or less if you process more than 1 million images. The news sparked interest because Amazon is at the center of a political tussle over the accuracy and regulation of facial recognition. Amazon sells a facial-recognition service, part of a suite of image-analysis features called Rekognition, to customers that include police departments. Another Rekognition service tries to discern the gender of faces in photos. The company said Monday that the gender feature had been improved--apparently a response to research showing it was much less accurate for people with darker skin.


Build a talking, face-recognizing doorbell for about $100

@machinelearnbot

Registration for the O'Reilly Artificial Intelligence Conference, September 18-20, 2017, in San Francisco, is now open. Recently, I set out to install a doorbell in my new house and thought: why doesn't my doorbell tell me who is at the door? Most of my DIY projects end up costing more than the equivalent product, even if I value my time at $0 per hour. Something about supply chains and economies of scale, I guess. In the course of this project, I built a door camera that is not only way cheaper than my Dropcam, but it has some genuinely useful features that, for some reason, aren't available on the market yet.


Build a talking, face-recognizing doorbell for about $100

#artificialintelligence

Registration for the O'Reilly Artificial Intelligence Conference, June 26-29, 2017, in New York is now open. Recently, I set out to install a doorbell in my new house and thought: why doesn't my doorbell tell me who is at the door? Most of my DIY projects end up costing more than the equivalent product, even if I value my time at $0 per hour. Something about supply chains and economies of scale, I guess. In the course of this project, I built a door camera that is not only way cheaper than my Dropcam, but it has some genuinely useful features that, for some reason, aren't available on the market yet.


Amazon claims Rekognition can now detect fear

#artificialintelligence

Amazon Web Services' facial recognition technology, Rekognition, can now detect fear. At least, that's according to Amazon -- but given that the tech has been proven inaccurate again and again, it's hard to say whether the newly announced capability actually works as advertised. On Monday, Amazon Web Services (AWS) published a blog post detailing several updates to its controversial tech, including improved accuracy at detecting seven emotions on a person's face -- happy, sad, angry, surprised, disgusted, calm, and confused -- with fear added as an eighth emotion. The company also claimed it had improved Rekognition's ability to estimate a person's gender as well as their age, with the tech now providing a narrower range of possibilities for most age groups. The announcement of the updates was met by a wave of criticism online, with cloud computing economist Corey Quinn noting that the move seems incredibly ill-timed given recent controversy surrounding Rekognition.


I wrote a facial rekognition app in under two hours *

#artificialintelligence

OK, I'll admit I didn't actually write the facial recognition bit of my app. But, I did find out how painless, quick and incredibly cheap it is to add facial recognition to your repertoire. As soon as I saw the release of Rekognition back in early December 2016, I wanted to play with it but just didn't have the opportunity at the time. A few weeks later, I read the famous post about building Jarvis from Mark Zuckerberg. And, guess what, the facial recognition part stood out to me once again.