Goto

Collaborating Authors

Stephen Hawking mourned by celebrities after his death at age 76

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The world today paid tribute to physicist Stephen Hawking, who died today at the age of 76. The famed British theoretical physicist passed away peacefully at his home in Cambridge this morning after a long battle with motor neurone disease, his family has revealed. And the celebrity and scientific world, including NASA, Katy Perry, and Piers Morgan, took to Twitter to pay their respects to the father of three. His theories unlocked a universe of possibilities that we & the world are exploring. The world just dropped a lot of IQ points.


Stephen Hawking dies peacefully aged 76 at his Cambridge home

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Professor Stephen Hawking has died at the age of 76 - more than 50 years after he was given just two years to live. The world's most celebrated scientist passed away peacefully at his home in Cambridge this morning after a long battle with motor neurone disease, his family has revealed. His children, Lucy, Robert and Tim said in a statement: 'We are deeply saddened that our beloved father passed away today. 'He once said, 'It would not be much of a universe if it wasn't home to the people you love.' We will miss him forever'. They also said their father's'courage, persistence, brilliance and humour inspired people across the world' - shown in a recent poll that saw him voted the 25th greatest Briton of all time. Professor Hawking was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in 1963 when he was 21 and he defied medical experts who said he would be dead within two years. In the following 55 years he became the world's most famous scientist since Albert Einstein for his work exploring the mysteries of space, time and black holes despite being wheelchair-bound and only able to communicate using a computer and his famous voice synthesizer. University of Cambridge vice-chancellor Professor Stephen Toope said today: 'His exceptional contributions to scientific knowledge and the popularisation of science and mathematics have left an indelible legacy. His character was an inspiration to millions'.


Stephen Hawking, famed physicist, dead at 76

FOX News

Physicist Stephen Hawking has died at age 76, according to a family spokesman. Stephen Hawking, the famed theoretical physicist who defied a diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to live virtually his entire adult life with the disease – in a wheelchair and paralyzed but making constant contributions to a world few could understand – has died at age 76, a family spokesman said. Although Hawking may have been incapacitated physically, he managed to write books, including the best seller "A Brief History of Time," teach physics and mathematics, deliver speeches and even float in zero gravity, all while working in the fields of cosmology and quantum gravity. He was not modest about what he wanted to do. "My goal is simple," he once said.


Stephen Hawking, legendary physicist, dies at 76, family says

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

If the big bang theory is an explanation on how the universe was created, then what existed before the big bang occurred? In this file photo taken on Sept. 19, 2013, theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking poses for a picture ahead of a gala screening of the documentary "Hawking," a film about the scientist's life. Stephen Hawking, one of the world's foremost theoretical physicists, has died at age 76. On the cover of the Oxford Dictionary of Scientists, Hawking appeared with Einstein and Madame Curie, an apt demonstration of his renown. For decades, Hawking was confined to a wheelchair by a form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's Disease, a neurological disease that handcuffs movement.


Stephen Hawking - Wikipedia

@machinelearnbot

Stephen William Hawking CH CBE FRS FRSA (8 January 1942 – 14 March 2018)[14][15] was an English theoretical physicist, cosmologist, author and Director of Research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology within the University of Cambridge.[16][17] His scientific works included a collaboration with Roger Penrose on gravitational singularity theorems in the framework of general relativity and the theoretical prediction that black holes emit radiation, often called Hawking radiation. Hawking was the first to set out a theory of cosmology explained by a union of the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. He was a vigorous supporter of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics.[18][19] Hawking was an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA), a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States. In 2002, Hawking was ranked number 25 in the BBC's poll of the 100 Greatest Britons. He was the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge between 1979 and 2009 and achieved commercial success with works of popular science in which he discusses his own theories and cosmology in general. His book, A Brief History of Time, appeared on the British Sunday Times best-seller list for a record-breaking 237 weeks. Hawking had a rare early-onset slow-progressing form of motor neurone disease (also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Lou Gehrig's disease), that gradually paralysed him over the decades.[20][21] Even after the loss of his speech, he was still able to communicate through a speech-generating device, initially through use of a hand-held switch, and eventually by using a single cheek muscle. Hawking was born on 8 January 1942[22] in Oxford to Frank (1905–1986) and Isobel Hawking (née Walker; 1915–2013).[23][24] Despite their families' financial constraints, both parents attended the University of Oxford, where Frank read medicine and Isobel read Philosophy, Politics and Economics.[24] The two met shortly after the beginning of the Second World War at a medical research institute where Isobel was working as a secretary and Frank was working as a medical researcher.[24][26] They lived in Highgate; but, as London was being bombed in those years, Isobel went to Oxford to give birth in greater safety.[27] Hawking had two younger sisters, Philippa and Mary, and an adopted brother, Edward.[28] In 1950, when Hawking's father became head of the division of parasitology at the National Institute for Medical Research, Hawking and his family moved to St Albans, Hertfordshire.[29][30]