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These glasses trick facial recognition software into thinking you're someone else

#artificialintelligence

Facial recognition software has become increasingly common in recent years. Facebook uses it to tag your photos; the FBI has a massive facial recognition database spanning hundreds of millions of images; and in New York, there are even plans to add smart, facial recognition surveillance cameras to every bridge and tunnel. But while these systems seem inescapable, the technology that underpins them is far from infallible. In fact, it can be beat with a pair of psychedelic-looking glasses that cost just $0.22. Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University have shown that specially designed spectacle frames can fool even state-of-the-art facial recognition software.


Image Recognition: A peek into the future

#artificialintelligence

Our brains are wired in a way that they can differentiate between objects, both living and non-living by simply looking at them. In fact, the recognition of objects and a situation through visualization is the fastest way to gather, as well as to relate information. This becomes a pretty big deal for computers where a vast amount of data has to be stuffed into it, before the computer can perform an operation on its own. Ironically, with each passing day, it is becoming essential for machines to identify objects through facial recognition, so that humans can take the next big step towards a more scientifically advanced social mechanism. So, what progress have we really made in that respect?


Facial Recognition: the Advent of a New Era in Non-Digital Marketing?

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The Facial Recognition Technology Is Known to Have Gained a Foothold in Many Industry Verticals and It Keeps on Continuously Charting New Ground. Facial Recognition has gained so much traction in an entire host of verticals and applications (according to Variant Market Research, its market is expected to be worth some $ 15.4 billion by 2024) that most anyone, regardless of the kind of business they are in, should look into whether the technology could come in handy in reaching their business objectives. In part, this is owing to the ability of the Facial Recognition technology to better equip and advance the field of expertise known as Marketing, - something universal and of the utmost importance to most industries. Moreover, Face Recognition can make a dent in precisely those areas of Marketing, in which the now rampant Digital Marketing falls short, or is, simply, irrelevant. What are those areas, how much headway has been made already and what are the potentialities one should be aware of?


Facial recognition software is biased towards white men, researcher finds

#artificialintelligence

New research out of MIT's Media Lab is underscoring what other experts have reported or at least suspected before: facial recognition technology is subject to biases based on the data sets provided and the conditions in which algorithms are created. Joy Buolamwini, a researcher at the MIT Media Lab, recently built a dataset of 1,270 faces, using the faces of politicians, selected based on their country's rankings for gender parity (in other words, having a significant number of women in public office). Buolamwini then tested the accuracy of three facial recognition systems: those made by Microsoft, IBM, and Megvii of China. The results, which were originally reported in The New York Times, showed inaccuracies in gender identification dependent on a person's skin color. Gender was misidentified in less than one percent of lighter-skinned males; in up to seven percent of lighter-skinned females; up to 12 percent of darker-skinned males; and up to 35 percent in darker-skinner females.


AI Weekly: Facial recognition policy makers debate temporary moratorium vs. permanent ban

#artificialintelligence

On Tuesday, in an 8-1 tally, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted to ban the use of facial recognition software by city departments, including police. Supporters of the ban cited racial inequality in audits of facial recognition software from companies like Amazon and Microsoft, as well as dystopian surveillance happening now in China. At the core of arguments around the regulation of facial recognition software use is the question of whether a temporary moratorium should be put in place until police and governments adopt policies and standards or it should be permanently banned. Some believe facial recognition software can be used to exonerate the innocent and that more time is needed to gather information. Others, like San Francisco Supervisor Aaron Peskin, believe that even if AI systems achieve racial parity, facial recognition is a "uniquely dangerous and oppressive technology."