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Groundbreaking Moment as a Robot Closes the NY Stock Exchange

#artificialintelligence

Last Wednesday, Oct. 17, traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) were treated to a first-ever experience: A collaborative robot (cobot) rang the day's closing bell. The cobot was Universal Robots' UR5e with a two-finger gripper from Robotiq. This particular ceremony celebrated the five-year anniversary of ROBO Global, the first-ever robotics, automation, and AI index. Having launched in October 2013, it currently invests into more than 80 companies across the globe, including 12 subsectors ranging from manufacturing to healthcare. Despite the sudden departure of Rethink Robotics, which was one of the leaders in the cobot market, the cobot industry remains the fastest-growing sector of the industrial automation market.


Robot, Cobot or Sobot? - Disruption

#artificialintelligence

We live in a world of robots, whether we know it or not. . . From the machines that work in manufacturing to the chatbots that deal with customer queries, robots are becoming increasingly integral to society. The problem is, how do humans know when they're interacting with a robot, and how can they tell what kind of bot they're interacting with? Robots can be broadly split into two categories – Cobots and Sobots. A cobot is, a mechanical co-worker.



Introducing the cobot: Humans and robots working together

#artificialintelligence

Humans might take heart from the recent decision by Mercedes-Benz to replace robots with humans on some lines. The machines were just not agile enough to keep pace with the growing demand for customised products while we humans can "reprogram" ourselves in a fraction of a second. "We're moving away from trying to maximise automation, with people taking a bigger part in industrial processes again," says Markus Schaefer, head of production planning at the automaker. "When we have people and machines co-operate, such as a person guiding a part-automatic robot, we're much more flexible and can produce many more products on one production line. The variety is too much to take on for the machines."


Meet the Cobots: Humans and Robots Together on the Factory Floor

National Geographic

Humans might take heart from the recent decision by Mercedes-Benz to replace robots with humans on some lines. The machines were just not agile enough to keep pace with the growing demand for customized products while we humans can "reprogram" ourselves in a fraction of a second. "We're moving away from trying to maximize automation, with people taking a bigger part in industrial processes again," says Markus Schaefer, head of production planning at the automaker. "When we have people and machines cooperate, such as a person guiding a part-automatic robot, we're much more flexible and can produce many more products on one production line. The variety is too much to take on for the machines."