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AI can detect Alzheimer's 10 years before symptoms show up

Engadget

Various researchers around the globe are developing ways to detect Alzheimer's as early as possible. After all, early detection gives people the power seek treatment that can slow down the condition's effects, as well as enough time to get their legal and financial affairs in order. Some decided to focus on blood and cerebrospinal fluid tests, while others are developing gadgets that can look for early signs. A team of researchers from the University of Bari in Italy, however, believe the answer lies in artificial intelligence. They trained their AI by feeding it 67 MRI scans -- 38 from Alzheimer's patients and 29 from healthy controls.


We could detect Alzheimer's with an eye test in the near future

Mashable

Participants of the Memory and Aging Project at Washington University's Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center found out they had an increased chance of developing Alzheimer's after an analysis of the condition of their eyes. Now researchers think a simple eye exam could help detect the deadly disease, and save lives in the future.


Artificial Intelligence Can Detect Alzheimer's At 95% Accuracy

#artificialintelligence

Researchers have developed software that detects Alzheimer's using artificial intelligence (AI) at 95% accuracy. Stevens Institute of Technology researchers have developed software that detects subtle changes in Alzheimer's patients' languages. Also, it can explain the diagnosis and allows physicians to re-check the findings. "This is a real breakthrough," said Stevens Institute of Technology lead researcher K.P. Subbalakshmi adding that we are "opening an exciting new field of research." Subbalakshmi is the founding director of the Stevens Institute of Artificial Intelligence as well as an electrical and computer engineering professor at the Charles V. Schaeffer School of Engineering.


Blood test detects Alzheimer's plaques building up in brain

New Scientist

A blood test can detect whether plaques of beta-amyloid are building up in a person's brain – a sign that they may develop Alzheimer's disease. People with Alzheimer's disease tend to have sticky clumps of beta-amyloid in their brains, although the part these plaques play in the condition is unclear. Until now, the only way to monitor plaque build-up in a person's brain has been through expensive PET-scans, or by performing an invasive spinal tap procedure. Now a team has developed a simple blood test that may make it possible for family doctors to screen for Alzheimer's risk during health check-ups. "This kind of test could be used to screen many thousands of patients to identify those at risk for Alzheimer's disease, and to start treatments before memory loss and brain damage," says Randall Bateman, of Washington University in St Louis, who unveiled the test at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in London today.


Artificial intelligence can detect Alzheimer's decade before symptoms emerge

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) can identify Alzheimer's disease 10 years before doctors can discover the symptoms, according to new research. A team of researchers in Italy developed an algorithm that can spot structural changes in the brain that are caused by the disease a decade before the signs become apparent. The team from the University of Bari trained the AI by feeding in 67 MRI scans - 38 from Alzheimer's patients and 29 healthy patients - then asked it to analyse the neuronal connectivity to form an algorithm. Following the training, the AI was then asked to process brains from 148 subjects - 52 were healthy, 48 had Alzheimer's disease and 48 had mild cognitive impairment (MCI) but were known to have developed Alzheimer's disease two and a half to nine years later. According to the researchers, the AI diagnosed Alzheimer's disease 86 per cent of the time.