Google moving into "Hardware" as the Internet of things Era takes hold

Huffington Post - Tech news and opinion

Google's strategic move into selling own branded Mobile phones is another step in the merging of "Software plus Hardware" that Apple, Microsoft, Amazon and recently Facebook have realized at the making of the "Internet of Things" Era. This is the critical issue of not just providing the software and operating system but increasing the value in the devices that become the Interface to the Customer: the smart phone, the smart tablet/laptop of Microsoft Surface, the Smart Speaker of Amazon Echo and Alexa, and the Facebook Oculus Rift and Microsoft Hololens that are the new foundations of Natural Language speech recognition services and the VR Virtual Reality and AR Augmented Reality breaking now and into 2017 and onward. Google's long-term market is changing, the advertising revenue from search engines while still strong is now seeing new ways to search via speech or Virtual image recognition and virtual interaction Google has been late to realizing perhaps the shift to software hardware is where the Internet of Things may be shaping the market with the Connected Home, Connected Car and Connected Work through these devices. It's all about "market marking" beyond just the big cloud data centers and big data analytics to how to build out the edge of the cloud network with all these potentially billions of connected sensors and devices. If the Mobile phone is becoming the "remote control to this world" and platforms the "fabric of social networks and connected experiences" then Google like others is rushing to get into this space with stronger software and hardware offerings


Google hopes to thwart quantum computers from cracking today's Internet encryption

PCWorld

The encryption methods used to secure today's Internet communications won't be impenetrable forever. More powerful "quantum computers" on the horizon could very well crack them. That's why Google is testing out new cryptography that computers in the future might not be able to break. The processing power offered by "hypothetical, future" quantum computers could be enough to "decrypt any internet communication that was recorded today," wrote Matt Braithwaite, a Google software engineer in a company blog post on Thursday. This could affect the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol used when visiting websites.


Google bolsters Chrome's defenses against quantum computing attacks

PCWorld

The encryption methods used to secure today's internet communications won't be impenetrable forever. More powerful "quantum computers" on the horizon could very well crack them. That's why Google is testing out new cryptography that computers in the future might not be able to break. The processing power offered by "hypothetical, future" quantum computers could be enough to "decrypt any internet communication that was recorded today," wrote Matt Braithwaite, a Google software engineer in a company blog post on Thursday. This could affect the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol used when visiting websites.


Programming With Computers, Partnering With Machines To Create Programs

#artificialintelligence

I have been invited to write a book chapter on lexical choice for translators (contact me if you want to see a preprint). To get acquainted on this audience different from my usual computer science I read a few papers on professional translators use of technology. Two of them are quite interesting and I recommend them not only because they make for a good read and they have implications outside translation: Translation Skill-sets in a Machine-translation Age by Anthony Pym (2013) and Is Machine Translation Post-editing Worth the Effort?: A Survey of Research into Post-editing and Effort by Maarit Koponen (2016). This search finished by reading a short ebook by researchers at the MIT Center for Digital Business titled Race Against the Machine: How the Digital Revolution Is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity, and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy. In that book plus the papers there's this call for humans, if we want to remain employed, to hybridize our work and to seek out ways to work with the computer as some sort of partnership.


US government agencies are still using Windows 3.1, floppy disks and 1970s computers

PCWorld

Some U.S. government agencies are using IT systems running Windows 3.1, the decades-old COBOL and Fortran programming languages, or computers from the 1970s. A backup nuclear control messaging system at the U.S. Department of Defense runs on an IBM Series 1 computer, first introduced in 1976, and uses eight-inch floppy disks, while the Internal Revenue Service's master file of taxpayer data is written in assembly language code that's more than five decades old, according to a new report from the Government Accountability Office. Some agencies are still running Windows 3.1, first released in 1992, as well as the newer but unsupported Windows XP, Representative Jason Chaffetz, a Utah Republican, noted during a Wednesday hearing on outdated government IT systems. The government is spending more than US 80 billion a year on IT, and "it largely doesn't work," Chaffetz said during a House of Representatives Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing. "The federal government is years, and sometimes decades, behind the private sector."