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The year deepfakes went mainstream

MIT Technology Review

In 2018, Sam Cole, a reporter at Motherboard, discovered a new and disturbing corner of the internet. A Reddit user by the name of "deepfakes" was posting nonconsensual fake porn videos using an AI algorithm to swap celebrities' faces into real porn. Cole sounded the alarm on the phenomenon, right as the technology was about to explode. A year later, deepfake porn had spread far beyond Reddit, with easily accessible apps that could "strip" clothes off any woman photographed. Since then deepfakes have had a bad rap, and rightly so.


Creepy Apollo 11 Nixon deepfake video created by MIT to show dangers of high-tech misinformation

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. Scientists at MIT have digitally manipulated video and audio to create a creepy deepfake of President Nixon "delivering" a speech that would have been used in the event of an Apollo 11 disaster. Written in 1969, the contingency speech was to be used if NASA astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were unable to return from the moon. The video is part of a project entitled "In Event of Moon Disaster" that aims to highlight the dangers of deepfakes, which use artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to create false, but realistic-looking clips.


Deepfake video shows President Richard Nixon announcing the failure of the 1969 moon landing

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A scarily realistic deepfake video shows what it would have looked like if President Richard Nixon was forced to deliver a sombre address to the world had the Apollo 11 mission ended in disaster. It is well-known that the American president had two speeches prepared, one in case of a safe landing and one in the event that tragedy struck. Fortuitously, the landing on July 20 1969 by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin was a resounding success, rendering the latter redundant. However, experts at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have created an entirely artificial video showing what it may have looked and sounded like. It is part of a project called'Moon Disaster' and is designed to draw attention to the risk deepfakes pose and how they can manipulate people and spread fake news.


How Deepfakes Make Disinformation More Real Than Ever

#artificialintelligence

One video shows Barack Obama using an obscenity to refer to U.S. President Donald Trump. Another features a different former president, Richard Nixon, performing a comedy routine. But neither video is real: The first was created by filmmaker Jordan Peele, the second by Jigsaw, a technology incubator within Alphabet, Inc. Both are examples of deepfakes, videos or audios that use artificial intelligence to make someone appear to do or say something they didn't. The technology is a few years old and getting better.