This chatbot fought parking fines and now it's helping refugees

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Refugees can now use a Facebook chatbot to apply for asylum in the US, Canada, and the UK -- helping them navigate unfamiliar legal systems and avoid exorbitant lawyers' fees. It's an update to DoNotPay -- a Facebook chatbot that assisted 250,000 people in challenging parking fines, and has since been expanded into multiple other sectors, from claiming compensation for delayed flights to providing HIV legal advice. "Ultimately, I just want to level the playing field so there's a bot for everything," Joshua Browder, the Stanford student who created DoNotPay, told Business Insider. DoNotPay is a chatbot built in Facebook's messenger interface. It talks to the user and asks them questions, just like a real person, and records their responses.


A "Lawyer Bot" Has Helped 160,000 People Void Their Parking Tickets

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With the rising anxiety about robots taking over human jobs, now even lawyers may have a reason to be on the edge of their seats. A 19-year-old Stanford University student, Joshua Browder, impressively taught himself how to code and ended up creating what he claims is the "world's first robot lawyer," according to The Guardian. Over the past 21 months, the artificial intelligence (AI) lawyer chatbot has successfully helped void 160,000 parking tickets in London and New York. The bot has done it all for free. Remarkably, DoNotPay chatbot has taken on a quarter of a million parking ticket cases, and the AI lawyer has won 64 percent of them.


Chatbot lawyer overturns 160,000 parking tickets in London and New York

The Guardian

An artificial-intelligence lawyer chatbot has successfully contested 160,000 parking tickets across London and New York for free, showing that chatbots can actually be useful. Dubbed as "the world's first robot lawyer" by its 19-year-old creator, London-born second-year Stanford University student Joshua Browder, DoNotPay helps users contest parking tickets in an easy to use chat-like interface. The program first works out whether an appeal is possible through a series of simple questions, such as were there clearly visible parking signs, and then guides users through the appeals process. The results speak for themselves. In the 21 months since the free service was launched in London and now New York, DoNotPay has taken on 250,000 cases and won 160,000, giving it a success rate of 64% appealing over 4m of parking tickets.


Chatbot lawyer overturns 160,000 parking tickets in London and New York

#artificialintelligence

An artificial-intelligence lawyer chatbot has successfully contested 160,000 parking tickets across London and New York for free, showing that chatbots can actually be useful. Dubbed as "the world's first robot lawyer" by its 19-year-old creator, London-born second-year Stanford University student Joshua Browder, DoNotPay helps users contest parking tickets in an easy to use chat-like interface. The program first works out whether an appeal is possible through a series of simple questions, such as were there clearly visible parking signs, and then guides users through the appeals process. The results speak for themselves. In the 21 months since the free service was launched in London and now New York, Browder says DoNotPay has taken on 250,000 cases and won 160,000, giving it a success rate of 64% appealing over 4m of parking tickets.


AI Chatbot Lawyers for the Law Firms of the Future - Nanalyze

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The rampant spread of artificial intelligence (AI) across all industries is happening so fast that our MBAs can barely keep up with it, making us wonder โ€“ when can we just replace our MBAs with artificial intelligence and never have to hear about Porter's 5 Forces ever again? Just about every stakeholder out there who has an economic interest tied to a firm is asking the same question โ€“ no, not about Porter โ€“ about how can we use AI to create more efficiencies and outperform our competitors. Some industries just scream out their suitability for an AI take over, like the legal industry for example. According to the American Bar Association, there are 1.1 million lawyers practicing in the U.S., a number which represents 80% of the world's lawyers. While some of these lawyers do good, many do not.