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Artificial intelligence could improve CT screening for COVID-19 diagnosis

#artificialintelligence

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame are developing a new technique using artificial intelligence (AI) that would improve CT screening to more quickly identify patients with the coronavirus. The new technique will reduce the burden on the radiologists tasked with screening each image. Testing challenges have led to an influx of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 requiring CT scans which have revealed visual signs of the disease, including ground glass opacities, a condition that consists of abnormal lesions, presenting as a haziness on images of the lungs. "Most patients with coronavirus show signs of COVID-related pneumonia on a chest CT but with the large number of suspected cases, radiologists are working overtime to screen them all," said Yiyu Shi, associate professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Notre Dame and the lead researcher on the project. "We have shown that we can use deep learning--a field of AI--to identify those signs, drastically speeding up the screening process and reducing the burden on radiologists."


Artificial intelligence could improve CT screening for COVID-19 diagnosis

#artificialintelligence

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame are developing a new technique using artificial intelligence (AI) that would improve CT screening to more quickly identify patients with the coronavirus. The new technique will reduce the burden on the radiologists tasked with screening each image. Testing challenges have led to an influx of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 requiring CT scans which have revealed visual signs of the disease, including ground glass opacities, a condition that consists of abnormal lesions, presenting as a haziness on images of the lungs. "Most patients with coronavirus show signs of COVID-related pneumonia on a chest CT but with the large number of suspected cases, radiologists are working overtime to screen them all," said Yiyu Shi, associate professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Notre Dame and the lead researcher on the project. "We have shown that we can use deep learning -- a field of AI -- to identify those signs, drastically speeding up the screening process and reducing the burden on radiologists."


Teaching Artificial Intelligence to diagnose COVID-19

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The new dataset contains more than 1,000 anonymised sets of chest CT scans. This expands on the earlier database of CT studies of patients with laboratory-confirmed infection created by scientists at the Diagnostics and Telemedicine Centre. The data set aims to inform AI to diagnose COVID-19. The dataset is the largest to date, and all CT studies in the dataset have a special marking made according to the classification, which reflects the manifestation of pathological abnormalities of COVID-19 in the lung tissue based on the chest computed tomography. According to experts at the Diagnostics and Telemedicine Center, a database with CT scans converted into the'research' Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (NIFTI) format is intended for developing artificial intelligence algorithms.


How Might AI and Chest Imaging Help Unravel COVID-19's Mysteries?

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Artificial intelligence (AI) has the potential to expand the role of chest imaging in COVID-19 beyond diagnosis to enable risk stratification, treatment monitoring, and discovery of novel therapeutic targets. AI's power to generate models from large volumes of information – fusing molecular, clinical, epidemiological, and imaging data – may accelerate solutions to detect, contain, and treat COVID-19. Two healthcare workers fell ill in Wuhan, China, where the first Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) case was reported. Both were 29 years old and were hospitalized after contracting the virus. One survived, the other died. In a global pandemic that has suddenly pushed doctors, scientists, and healthcare workers to the frontlines, why some patients are falling critically ill while others have minimal or no symptoms is one of the most mysterious aspects of the disease caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).


Artificial intelligence could improve CT screening for COVID-19 diagnosis – IAM Network

#artificialintelligence

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame are developing a new technique using artificial intelligence (AI) that would improve CT screening to more quickly identify patients with the coronavirus. The new technique will reduce the burden on the radiologists tasked with screening each image. Testing challenges have led to an influx of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 requiring CT scans which have revealed visual signs of the disease, including ground glass opacities, a condition that consists of abnormal lesions, presenting as a haziness on images of the lungs. "Most patients with coronavirus show signs of COVID-related pneumonia on a chest CT but with the large number of suspected cases, radiologists are working overtime to screen them all," said Yiyu Shi, associate professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Notre Dame and the lead researcher on the project. "We have shown that we can use deep learning--a field of AI--to identify those signs, drastically speeding up the screening process and reducing the burden on radiologists."