Goto

Collaborating Authors

British PM May Tells Scotland: Take Your Demand for Independence Vote off the Table

U.S. News

Britain's Prime Minister, Theresa May, waits to greet Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) Leader Arlene Foster, in Downing Street, in central London, Britain June 26, 2017. LONDON (Reuters) - British Prime Minister Theresa May said on Tuesday that Scottish leader Nicola Sturgeon should take a demand for a second independence referendum off the table. "What I think Nicola Sturgeon should be saying today is that she's going to completely take off the table the question of Indy Ref 2, a second independence referendum in Scotland," May told Sky. "I think that was the clear message from the general election and I think now is the time for the United Kingdom to be pulling together, not being driven apart," May said. Not all U.S. presidents are missed once they leave the White House. The president hosted the Indian leader in Washington on Monday.


Donald Trump 'expected to visit Scotland'

BBC News

Donald Trump is expected to visit Scotland on his trip to the UK this summer, BBC Scotland understands. The full itinerary for the US president's visit has not yet been finalised. But BBC Scotland correspondent Glenn Campbell said the current plan included a Scottish leg to his tour. Mr Trump, whose mother was born on the Isle of Lewis, owns golf resorts in Aberdeenshire and at Turnberry in Ayrshire. Speaking in January, he described his regret at not being able to visit Scotland since he became US president, describing the country as a "very special place" with "very special people".


UK, US, Canada accuse Russia of hacking virus vaccine trials

Boston Herald

LONDON (AP) -- Britain, the United States and Canada accused Russia on Thursday of trying to steal information from researchers seeking a COVID-19 vaccine. The three nations alleged that hacking group APT29, also known as Cozy Bear and said to be part of the Russian intelligence service, is attacking academic and pharmaceutical research institutions involved in coronavirus vaccine development. Britain's National Cybersecurity Centre made the announcement, which was coordinated with authorities in the U.S. and Canada. "It is completely unacceptable that the Russian Intelligence Services are targeting those working to combat the coronavirus pandemic," British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said in a statement. "While others pursue their selfish interests with reckless behaviour, the U.K. and its allies are getting on with the hard work of finding a vaccine and protecting global health."


Russia sowing seeds of world instability, Ash Carter warns

The Japan Times

OXFORD, ENGLAND – U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter accused Russia on Wednesday of sowing seeds of global instability and questioned whether Moscow genuinely wants a viable cease-fire in Syria. In a hard-hitting speech at Oxford University, Carter emphasized deep skepticism about Russian intentions in Syria, even as U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry prepared to fly to Geneva for more talks with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov. Their discussions last weekend, on the sidelines of an economic summit in China, failed to produce a nationwide cease-fire in Syria or a U.S.-Russian military cooperation agreement. Russia is a firm supporter of Syrian President Bashar Assad, and their joint military operation has sometimes targeted the anti-Islamic State rebels backed by the Obama administration. The Russian Foreign Ministry said Kerry and Lavrov would hold their next round of talks Thursday and Friday.


Russian hacking went far beyond US election, digital hitlist reveals

The Guardian

The hackers who upended the US presidential election had ambitions well beyond Hillary Clinton's campaign, targeting the emails of Ukrainian officers, Russian opposition figures, US defense contractors and thousands of others of interest to the Kremlin, according to a previously unpublished digital hitlist obtained by the Associated Press. The news comes as US prosecutors are reportedly considering charges against six members of the Russian government accused of hacking into the Democratic national committee's computers. The list obtained by the AP provides the most detailed forensic evidence yet of the close alignment between the hackers and the Russian government, exposing an operation that stretched back years and tried to break into the inboxes of 4,700 Gmail users across the globe – from the pope's representative in Kiev to the punk band Pussy Riot in Moscow. "It's a wishlist of who you'd want to target to further Russian interests," said Keir Giles, director of the Conflict Studies Research Center in Cambridge, England, and one of five outside experts who reviewed the AP's findings. He said the data was "a master list of individuals whom Russia would like to spy on, embarrass, discredit or silence."