British people are using Wi-Fi hotspots to watch porn in public

The Independent

One in 12 British people use public Wi-Fi to access pornographic content, according to a new report. Some of the most popular places to watch pornography in public are restaurants, train stations, offices and libraries, though the street is also a common choice. Norton by Symantec has warned public Wi-Fi users that they risk exposing themselves to hackers, unless they start taking proper precautions. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.


This start-up is building a humanoid robot that could soon be delivering packages to your door

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So far, Agility Robotics has sold three Cassie robots (University of Michigan is a customer, for example) and has sales for another three in progress. The goal is to sell another six Cassie robots, "so optimistically 12 customers total for the entire production run of Cassie," Shelton tells CNBC Make It. "That is obviously, though, a relatively compact market, and is not why we're doing the company," says Shelton, in an interview with CNBC Make It. Indeed, the next generation of the company's legged robots will also have arms, says Shelton. And one target use for the more humanoid robot will be carrying packages from delivery trucks to your door. Shelton says his house is a perfect example of how a legged robot would assist in delivery.


How to deal with FAA drone regulations, according to Workhorse CEO Steve Burns

ZDNet

When the FAA finally released commercial drone regulations earlier this year, many executives were disappointed . The rules -- especially the requirement that pilots keep drones within their line of sight -- dampened dreams of commercial delivery services. Steve Burns, CEO of Workhorse, a company that specializes in electric delivery trucks, has an unusually optimistic view. With that in mind, Workhorse plans to start using drones to deliver packages at the end of August. They have already been testing the system with a Section 333 Exemption, and the next step is conforming to the FAA's new rules.


Ask a Swiss: Highlights and new discoveries in Computer Vision, Machine Learning, and AI (March 2016)

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In the third issue of this monthly digest series you can find out how Microsoft is bringing AI to the visually impaired, how to colorize your grayscale images, why a Google car caused a crash for the first time, and much more. Last Thursday, Microsoft showed off its Seeing AI app for the first time. It's still under development, but it looks extremely promising. Using a smartphone camera or a pair of camera-equipped smart glasses, the Seeing AI app can identify things in your environment--people, objects, and even emotions--to provide important context for what's going on around you. By a swipe of hand, the user can instruct the app to take a snapshot of the current visual scene and run it through image recognition software.